Have I lost my “blog power”?

Anand M., in India, asks “has Scoble lost his blog power?” (I linked to him and he didn’t get many visits). My read? If I ever did have blog power, it’s gone now. Digg and TechMeme have all the power now.

I think Rageboy has the clue to what’s going on here (the yawning baby cracked Maryam up). I’m boring. Haven’t been linking to enough cool people and cool tech. Too much inbred inside-the-blogosphere, linking. Or, maybe, I’ve been doing too much linking and not enough first-hand-experience. Translation: not enough lists. Sorry. It’s hard to do good blogging when you’re busy all day long. Sigh.

But, Steve Gillmor has it right: this isn’t a game of traffic. It’s about sharing what you love. I love using tech and studying the product of geeks. Whether or not anyone is listening isn’t the reason I’m doing this (sometimes I forget that, yeah, but getting a link from Digg isn’t worth as much as everyone makes it seem). My passion? Trying out new stuff, finding new problems to solve. I haven’t been doing enough of that lately cause I’m just inside an email tidal storm that I can’t get off of me. Seriously, you have no idea how hard it is to keep up with email. I’m failing, and failing horribly. Sorry if I haven’t gotten back to you. Leave a comment instead of emailing.

The flow that’s happening in my life is simply incredible, especially when I compare it to what was going on in my life in 2002 when I worked at UserLand. Back then there were so few companies, very few interesting things going on. Today there’s SO much. I’m not surprised that it’s harder to get people to click on a link.

I was talking with Chris Messina and Tara Hunt on email tonight and said that just the number of events that’s happening in just the San Francisco area is stunning. I can’t keep up. It makes me just want to grab a bottle of wine and go sit on the beach out by the Ritz. Which is why I missed Barcamp this year. I just wanted a small, manageable conversation with a handful of geeks. It was SO enjoyable.

I’m thinking back on the last year and what I really remember and find special. That Swiss Chalet with a handful of geeks. That was it. Out of all the conferences (many expensive, like Mix06 where I had my own Las Vegas suite). All the PR. All the noise. All the events. Getting, what, five guys together in a Swiss Chalet for a weekend was the highlight of the year.

I wonder if we can have more of those types of experiences? I find I learn a lot more from conversations like that, and it helps me out cause then I have something interesting to say to you all.

The power of four people talking is something that’s just fascinated me all week.

Anyway, that’s enough of that. Everyone is getting bored, even me.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. I hear ya man. I’m so snowed under with email that I need a week of snow days just to catch up today. Heh.

    And on your topic of fours, long ago I determined that I would only write for my proverbial four readers to get over my fear of unfamous (even though I was far from famous then and remain so today).

    Anyway, small is the new big, as Godin likes to say. We’re bankin’ our business on it, so we’ll see how far that gets us. ;)

  2. I hear ya man. I’m so snowed under with email that I need a week of snow days just to catch up today. Heh.

    And on your topic of fours, long ago I determined that I would only write for my proverbial four readers to get over my fear of unfamous (even though I was far from famous then and remain so today).

    Anyway, small is the new big, as Godin likes to say. We’re bankin’ our business on it, so we’ll see how far that gets us. ;)

  3. I think Steve Gilmour is corect.This is not about links etc.
    I started about 6 weeks ago and chased my tail for a month becoming a total link junky.
    Now I write about subjects I like and one on which I have a little knowledge.
    Traffic builds slowly and I can sometimes go a week without a comment.
    But hey I got 445 hits yesterday and if I get 446 any day next week its progress.
    This isnt about who has the most toys its who gets to enjoy himself with the toys he has.
    Keep doing what you do.

  4. I think Steve Gilmour is corect.This is not about links etc.
    I started about 6 weeks ago and chased my tail for a month becoming a total link junky.
    Now I write about subjects I like and one on which I have a little knowledge.
    Traffic builds slowly and I can sometimes go a week without a comment.
    But hey I got 445 hits yesterday and if I get 446 any day next week its progress.
    This isnt about who has the most toys its who gets to enjoy himself with the toys he has.
    Keep doing what you do.

  5. I sure as heck am not the right guy to tell someone how to blog. But I wouldn’t revisit what you’ve done or worry about what you should do. Sometimes your blog is a little incestuous with regards to the “blogosphere” but aside from that I don’t really see anything has changed except we don’t get quite the same insights into microsoft that we used to. Only time will tell if that’s all that really interested your readers or not. Somehow I doubt it, but I am wrong a lot of the time.

    I could see how a dip in readership from time to time might be a bummer if you are used to tens of thousands of views per day. So maybe it’s stupid for me to say, don’t worry about it, but… don’t worry about it. :)

  6. I sure as heck am not the right guy to tell someone how to blog. But I wouldn’t revisit what you’ve done or worry about what you should do. Sometimes your blog is a little incestuous with regards to the “blogosphere” but aside from that I don’t really see anything has changed except we don’t get quite the same insights into microsoft that we used to. Only time will tell if that’s all that really interested your readers or not. Somehow I doubt it, but I am wrong a lot of the time.

    I could see how a dip in readership from time to time might be a bummer if you are used to tens of thousands of views per day. So maybe it’s stupid for me to say, don’t worry about it, but… don’t worry about it. :)

  7. Sure, there’s a lot of stuff going on. But so what. Know it is, then ignore it. You’re in a startup now. You can’t know everything. It isn’t your job. All that great stuff will affect you when it’s ready. Your job is to know your neck of the woods.
    As for all that email – what is it? Who is sending it? I assume most of it is speculative. Put an autoresponder on your email – Scoble apologizes, but he is in a different neck of the woods for a while. Please use a different method of getting his attention – like starting a great podcasting company.
    Then enjoy.

  8. Sure, there’s a lot of stuff going on. But so what. Know it is, then ignore it. You’re in a startup now. You can’t know everything. It isn’t your job. All that great stuff will affect you when it’s ready. Your job is to know your neck of the woods.
    As for all that email – what is it? Who is sending it? I assume most of it is speculative. Put an autoresponder on your email – Scoble apologizes, but he is in a different neck of the woods for a while. Please use a different method of getting his attention – like starting a great podcasting company.
    Then enjoy.

  9. Met: WordPress.com’s traffic log says one thing. But I trust guys like Anand who point out that people aren’t visiting him as much as they once did.

    It’s very possible that there’s reader fatigue. Or that I have different people reading me today than read me a year ago.

    It demonstrates, though, that having a lot of traffic isn’t what matters. What matters is getting the attention of people. My thesis? A post on an event in India talking about .NET isn’t as interesting as it was a year ago.

    It also points out that I don’t have the power to get you traffic, even if I link to you.

  10. Met: WordPress.com’s traffic log says one thing. But I trust guys like Anand who point out that people aren’t visiting him as much as they once did.

    It’s very possible that there’s reader fatigue. Or that I have different people reading me today than read me a year ago.

    It demonstrates, though, that having a lot of traffic isn’t what matters. What matters is getting the attention of people. My thesis? A post on an event in India talking about .NET isn’t as interesting as it was a year ago.

    It also points out that I don’t have the power to get you traffic, even if I link to you.

  11. Ivan: I like that!

    Here’s my email folders (I’m triaging my email into folders now):

    Add to Calendar (2)
    BlogStuff (447)
    Events (52)
    Interview requests (59)
    Mom stuff (6)
    Stuff I haven’t triaged yet (199)
    Stuff for PodTech (115)
    Business Stuff for PodTech I still need to answer (129)
    Requests (usually tech support for Microsoft) (65)
    Scoble Show (18)
    Vloggies (6)

    Whew, a lot of stuff.

  12. Ivan: I like that!

    Here’s my email folders (I’m triaging my email into folders now):

    Add to Calendar (2)
    BlogStuff (447)
    Events (52)
    Interview requests (59)
    Mom stuff (6)
    Stuff I haven’t triaged yet (199)
    Stuff for PodTech (115)
    Business Stuff for PodTech I still need to answer (129)
    Requests (usually tech support for Microsoft) (65)
    Scoble Show (18)
    Vloggies (6)

    Whew, a lot of stuff.

  13. Some people think there’s some imaginary sky fairy out there, who magically pays “A-List” bloggers big money to keep their stats high ;-)

    I’m still very interested in hearing what you have to say… although recently you seem, like me, a bit overwhelmed by the pace of things.

    Thanks for posting the cartoon =) Rock on.

  14. Some people think there’s some imaginary sky fairy out there, who magically pays “A-List” bloggers big money to keep their stats high ;-)

    I’m still very interested in hearing what you have to say… although recently you seem, like me, a bit overwhelmed by the pace of things.

    Thanks for posting the cartoon =) Rock on.

  15. I don’t think you have lost much blog cult power, per se. He hit it right in the 4th paragraph, people don’t much care about .NET stuff from India, plus India still has the outsource bad taste (“they stole my job” and etc.), and .NET is losing ratings points minute by minute. And you overhyped it, causing people to just ignore, like Smartphone, Tablet, UMPC, Vista…

    But the real bottom line: any events in India are serious buzzkills.

    You still have your cult power. But that “power” is isolated to a select smuggy geeky group, half of which will be indicted by the SEC…so don’t let it goto your head. I’d cut off and do a contentish Podtechy blog…and keep the insider-baseball and rants to this blog.

    Farm out your email load, get trusted associates to comb thru and daily brief…be Corporate and Presidential about it…

  16. I don’t think you have lost much blog cult power, per se. He hit it right in the 4th paragraph, people don’t much care about .NET stuff from India, plus India still has the outsource bad taste (“they stole my job” and etc.), and .NET is losing ratings points minute by minute. And you overhyped it, causing people to just ignore, like Smartphone, Tablet, UMPC, Vista…

    But the real bottom line: any events in India are serious buzzkills.

    You still have your cult power. But that “power” is isolated to a select smuggy geeky group, half of which will be indicted by the SEC…so don’t let it goto your head. I’d cut off and do a contentish Podtechy blog…and keep the insider-baseball and rants to this blog.

    Farm out your email load, get trusted associates to comb thru and daily brief…be Corporate and Presidential about it…

  17. How many bloggers are really little more than ‘summarisers’?

    A good blog should be interesting in the same way that any other media is interesting; i.e. original, quality content.

  18. How many bloggers are really little more than ‘summarisers’?

    A good blog should be interesting in the same way that any other media is interesting; i.e. original, quality content.

  19. It’s fantastic that you get to meet all these amazing tech people but why are you not publishing videos of these events.

    The aspect I liked the most when you were at MS was all the interesting people I would meet through your videos.

    Just plain text on the blog all the time gets a bit dull some times. I just don’t feel part of it any more.

    Would be great to get your comments on this…

  20. It’s fantastic that you get to meet all these amazing tech people but why are you not publishing videos of these events.

    The aspect I liked the most when you were at MS was all the interesting people I would meet through your videos.

    Just plain text on the blog all the time gets a bit dull some times. I just don’t feel part of it any more.

    Would be great to get your comments on this…

  21. Your musings on the best conversations caused me to finally publish a meditation on my own theory of how to facilitate the best conversations. Have been working on it for years and have the methodology down to a science.

    Vloggersations.

  22. Your musings on the best conversations caused me to finally publish a meditation on my own theory of how to facilitate the best conversations. Have been working on it for years and have the methodology down to a science.

    Vloggersations.

  23. I haven’t followed your blog long enough to really witness a trend in one direction or another, but I am not surprised that a single story on your blog doesn’t generate as huge a number of referrals as some might expect.

    You seem to take more of a shotgun approach to blogging. Somedays you post as many as ten (!) entries (August 28, in recent history). I personally find this a bit exhausting, so I pretty much just scan the subjects for interesting keywords (which is all anybody should be expected to do, I guess – but on other blogs the title may be gibberish and I’ll still read because the signal to noise ratio is much higher).

    Whereas some blogs seem like 99% editorial filters, yours is more of a reflector dish. Too blinding to click through, at times.

  24. I haven’t followed your blog long enough to really witness a trend in one direction or another, but I am not surprised that a single story on your blog doesn’t generate as huge a number of referrals as some might expect.

    You seem to take more of a shotgun approach to blogging. Somedays you post as many as ten (!) entries (August 28, in recent history). I personally find this a bit exhausting, so I pretty much just scan the subjects for interesting keywords (which is all anybody should be expected to do, I guess – but on other blogs the title may be gibberish and I’ll still read because the signal to noise ratio is much higher).

    Whereas some blogs seem like 99% editorial filters, yours is more of a reflector dish. Too blinding to click through, at times.

  25. Please! I’ve been reading your stuff for over a year. I would rather see you publish fewer posts with more meaning in each one. Rather than link to some else’s “named” blog; try linking to stories rather than glorified ad pages. Jonathan and Daniel J have got it right.

  26. Please! I’ve been reading your stuff for over a year. I would rather see you publish fewer posts with more meaning in each one. Rather than link to some else’s “named” blog; try linking to stories rather than glorified ad pages. Jonathan and Daniel J have got it right.

  27. Robert

    Is your email deluge the reason why I haven’t heard back from you about my problem with Hi-MD audio encryption and a duff disc?

    I hope that your interest in finding problems to solve might get you in touch with me :)

    Philip

  28. Robert

    Is your email deluge the reason why I haven’t heard back from you about my problem with Hi-MD audio encryption and a duff disc?

    I hope that your interest in finding problems to solve might get you in touch with me :)

    Philip

  29. Robert, don’t get lost in the bubble. I grew up in the Valley, it was great — you could feel the energy. I went back in 1999 and it felt ill — there was an arrogance, a bubble of ego, a disconnect from reality that felt just like the Beltway, where there was a reality distortion field so strong that people lost common sense.

    It’s happening again — keep your eyes on the real — you are so right to look to make the right people connections.

  30. Robert, don’t get lost in the bubble. I grew up in the Valley, it was great — you could feel the energy. I went back in 1999 and it felt ill — there was an arrogance, a bubble of ego, a disconnect from reality that felt just like the Beltway, where there was a reality distortion field so strong that people lost common sense.

    It’s happening again — keep your eyes on the real — you are so right to look to make the right people connections.

  31. Robert – I am sure you still have the power. Just to make sure I offer up my blog. http://dazilgroup.com/blog Go there find something to link to and I will give you the results. In the past I have been linked to by Digg, Netscape and Valleywag. And many others but those are the ones that really brought the traffic. My guess is you still have the power.

  32. Robert – I am sure you still have the power. Just to make sure I offer up my blog. http://dazilgroup.com/blog Go there find something to link to and I will give you the results. In the past I have been linked to by Digg, Netscape and Valleywag. And many others but those are the ones that really brought the traffic. My guess is you still have the power.

  33. Kind of agree, you have been too busy I’m guessing to comment in new tech as much as you did before. Also you have not link me yet :-( Should I post something bad about you? :-)
    Cheers
    Al

  34. Kind of agree, you have been too busy I’m guessing to comment in new tech as much as you did before. Also you have not link me yet :-( Should I post something bad about you? :-)
    Cheers
    Al

  35. Well, CTRL-Del on the BlogStuff folder can get rid of 447 messages right off the top. Like you said, leave a comment on your blog.

    Someone needs GTD ;-)

  36. Well, CTRL-Del on the BlogStuff folder can get rid of 447 messages right off the top. Like you said, leave a comment on your blog.

    Someone needs GTD ;-)

  37. You defn haven’t lost your blog power.

    After you linked to my site about the scraper, my site visits soured, so did the comments on that post :)

    Thanks!

  38. You defn haven’t lost your blog power.

    After you linked to my site about the scraper, my site visits soured, so did the comments on that post :)

    Thanks!

  39. Best tip I ever heard about dealing with a flooded inbox: delete the lot.

    If anything was important, they’ll e-mail you again :-).

  40. Best tip I ever heard about dealing with a flooded inbox: delete the lot.

    If anything was important, they’ll e-mail you again :-).

  41. “When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer.”

    One thing that has remained consistent about people with power: they all lose it eventually.

  42. “When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer.”

    One thing that has remained consistent about people with power: they all lose it eventually.

  43. Best tip I ever heard about dealing with a flooded inbox: delete the lot.

    So if can’t handle, burn down the place? And that’s assuming the other “important people” aren’t super busy themselves, deleting is not a solution. Proper management of is…

    The answer to a busy schedule is time management not the elimination of all appointments.

  44. Best tip I ever heard about dealing with a flooded inbox: delete the lot.

    So if can’t handle, burn down the place? And that’s assuming the other “important people” aren’t super busy themselves, deleting is not a solution. Proper management of is…

    The answer to a busy schedule is time management not the elimination of all appointments.

  45. You need to start ripping into your employer again. Those were entertaining days. I read anxiously each day to see if Scoble could get himself fired. :)

  46. You need to start ripping into your employer again. Those were entertaining days. I read anxiously each day to see if Scoble could get himself fired. :)

  47. LayZ: I have GTD. But it doesn’t work for someone with my flow level. At least not if I’m trying to do something else. What I probably need is to hire someone who’ll do nothing but do my email and calendar.

  48. LayZ: I have GTD. But it doesn’t work for someone with my flow level. At least not if I’m trying to do something else. What I probably need is to hire someone who’ll do nothing but do my email and calendar.

  49. “What I probably need is to hire someone who’ll do nothing but do my email and calendar.”

    That’s just what a startup needs…. :)

    Booger

  50. “What I probably need is to hire someone who’ll do nothing but do my email and calendar.”

    That’s just what a startup needs…. :)

    Booger

  51. Hi again Robert. It was helpful to hear your comments about your desires for a small campy get-together. Well.. you and I don’t know each other well–except for the fact that both you and Tara (and other folks you know) are speaking/performing at PLEXUS 2007 this coming May. I HEREBY commit Plexus to hosting such an event for like-minded folk during the evening of May 1 (Tuesday evening, which means everyone has to go to bed at a reasonable hour and under 3 mai tais, to perform well the next day). I will make you the Guest of Honor, and in fact, I ask you to guide the look, sound and feel and I/we will deliver–let’s call it Robert’s Camp at Plexus 2007. You see I can’t produce that during the day to a corporate audience–a scientific/geek audience yes, but not corporate. But I trust that our customers of the last 10 years CEOs, VPs, Directors of corporations including tech cos won’t acclimate to camp at this point. Surely some are closet campers. With the ambitious scope of this event I don’t feel like gambling with our day hours–although we aim to make it a different, sensory experience. Our site does not show what we are cooking yet (not frnaks and beans). But for the “wandering aimlessly”, let’s do it a la FooCamp, BarCamp–we can even pitch tents or lie around on the floor… Your call. I count myself among those lying around–will be somewhat liberating to shed a little social decorum for some authenticity, some truth or dare… So I await your comments back–I did not email you this since you are happy to share this way–true to blogging. Perhaps all campees could pitch in in creating this evening. I await you creative insights.

  52. Hi again Robert. It was helpful to hear your comments about your desires for a small campy get-together. Well.. you and I don’t know each other well–except for the fact that both you and Tara (and other folks you know) are speaking/performing at PLEXUS 2007 this coming May. I HEREBY commit Plexus to hosting such an event for like-minded folk during the evening of May 1 (Tuesday evening, which means everyone has to go to bed at a reasonable hour and under 3 mai tais, to perform well the next day). I will make you the Guest of Honor, and in fact, I ask you to guide the look, sound and feel and I/we will deliver–let’s call it Robert’s Camp at Plexus 2007. You see I can’t produce that during the day to a corporate audience–a scientific/geek audience yes, but not corporate. But I trust that our customers of the last 10 years CEOs, VPs, Directors of corporations including tech cos won’t acclimate to camp at this point. Surely some are closet campers. With the ambitious scope of this event I don’t feel like gambling with our day hours–although we aim to make it a different, sensory experience. Our site does not show what we are cooking yet (not frnaks and beans). But for the “wandering aimlessly”, let’s do it a la FooCamp, BarCamp–we can even pitch tents or lie around on the floor… Your call. I count myself among those lying around–will be somewhat liberating to shed a little social decorum for some authenticity, some truth or dare… So I await your comments back–I did not email you this since you are happy to share this way–true to blogging. Perhaps all campees could pitch in in creating this evening. I await you creative insights.

  53. Call me crazy, but I don’t think you need to blog as much as you do, particularly for someone so busy with work or who’s off to another party (sometimes they seem to be one and the same).

    Try adding up the number of words you’ve written in, say, the last two weeks. It’s a lot. Possibly too much.

  54. Call me crazy, but I don’t think you need to blog as much as you do, particularly for someone so busy with work or who’s off to another party (sometimes they seem to be one and the same).

    Try adding up the number of words you’ve written in, say, the last two weeks. It’s a lot. Possibly too much.

  55. Thanks for the link, dood. This means EGR will *definitely* get over 100 hits this month!

    oh yeah, we’re Keepin’ it Real(tm) over here.

  56. Thanks for the link, dood. This means EGR will *definitely* get over 100 hits this month!

    oh yeah, we’re Keepin’ it Real(tm) over here.

  57. @28, Dude, I’m not talking about the Outlook add in. Agree that thing sucks for high volume mail. I’m talking about the GTD practices.

  58. @28, Dude, I’m not talking about the Outlook add in. Agree that thing sucks for high volume mail. I’m talking about the GTD practices.

  59. It has to do a lot with the audience. And it depends on the topic.

    Haven gotten some links of you they all resultet in different clickbehaviour – some strong, some not.

  60. It has to do a lot with the audience. And it depends on the topic.

    Haven gotten some links of you they all resultet in different clickbehaviour – some strong, some not.

  61. You’ve been very mobile recently, both geographically and topically, and I think that’s definitely had an effect. When you were “off the grid” only the people who were interested in that experience were making you a must-see. And you can definitely own that space in time, but a week later you’re doing something completely different, and blogging about that, so you’ll lose those people. You’ve got to start over again from scratch building an audience.

    I’m stating it extremely, but that’s in effect what’s happening. When you were at Microsoft you were blogging about Microsoft and things that affected it as well as about your life. That didn’t change and so over time you came to own that blogspace. You were the default for that category. Now you’re blogging about some main thing which switches every week or so at least, because what you’re actually doing switches. That means you start to gain people in that field, but then you start to lose them when you switch to another field.

    The only solution to this is to be Robert Scoble, not the brand, the blogger, the individual. It’s the writing and the thinking that you do that will bring back the people you pick up in your bloggy travels. You’ve got it; have faith in it and use it.

    Gawd knows I am the farthest thing from a techie. It took me THREE YEARS to learn how to paste a picture into a forum. But I read you because you think and discuss the larger issues of the blogosphere, like this one, and you do it with humility, openness, and intelligence. I don’t always agree with you, but I always respect you.

    What’s juice, and does it matter? It’s not heart, and heart is worth more in the long run. Remember “Love is the Killer App?” Well it is.

  62. You’ve been very mobile recently, both geographically and topically, and I think that’s definitely had an effect. When you were “off the grid” only the people who were interested in that experience were making you a must-see. And you can definitely own that space in time, but a week later you’re doing something completely different, and blogging about that, so you’ll lose those people. You’ve got to start over again from scratch building an audience.

    I’m stating it extremely, but that’s in effect what’s happening. When you were at Microsoft you were blogging about Microsoft and things that affected it as well as about your life. That didn’t change and so over time you came to own that blogspace. You were the default for that category. Now you’re blogging about some main thing which switches every week or so at least, because what you’re actually doing switches. That means you start to gain people in that field, but then you start to lose them when you switch to another field.

    The only solution to this is to be Robert Scoble, not the brand, the blogger, the individual. It’s the writing and the thinking that you do that will bring back the people you pick up in your bloggy travels. You’ve got it; have faith in it and use it.

    Gawd knows I am the farthest thing from a techie. It took me THREE YEARS to learn how to paste a picture into a forum. But I read you because you think and discuss the larger issues of the blogosphere, like this one, and you do it with humility, openness, and intelligence. I don’t always agree with you, but I always respect you.

    What’s juice, and does it matter? It’s not heart, and heart is worth more in the long run. Remember “Love is the Killer App?” Well it is.

  63. I should perhaps add that today, if you look over your shoulder in the English language Top Blogs, I’m right there at #2. And I won’t be next week. I know this. I caught a meme as it was rising and got lucky. I am the biggest famewhore you’ll ever meet, but even I don’t take this seriously; it’s a discontinuity in the blog-time continuum.

    If my blog is good, I may retain a fraction of those new readers. A TINY fraction. The quality of any individual post is almost meaningless to a blog in terms of retaining readers. It’s the topics explored over time and the quality of that exploration that will bring people back.

    If I may overanalyze, I think there’s been some unsteadiness in your tone recently; nothing I can put my finger on, but it seems like we never know what we’re going to get recently, in terms of tone or subject matter. Once your life settles down a bit more, it seems natural that your self-expression in the blog will as well, and that will bring them back. I’m sure you’ll see a spike soon enough.

  64. I should perhaps add that today, if you look over your shoulder in the English language Top Blogs, I’m right there at #2. And I won’t be next week. I know this. I caught a meme as it was rising and got lucky. I am the biggest famewhore you’ll ever meet, but even I don’t take this seriously; it’s a discontinuity in the blog-time continuum.

    If my blog is good, I may retain a fraction of those new readers. A TINY fraction. The quality of any individual post is almost meaningless to a blog in terms of retaining readers. It’s the topics explored over time and the quality of that exploration that will bring people back.

    If I may overanalyze, I think there’s been some unsteadiness in your tone recently; nothing I can put my finger on, but it seems like we never know what we’re going to get recently, in terms of tone or subject matter. Once your life settles down a bit more, it seems natural that your self-expression in the blog will as well, and that will bring them back. I’m sure you’ll see a spike soon enough.

  65. Robert – I don’t think so. Since you linked to my blog earlier this week I have had thousands of visitors I would not have had – from all corners of the earth. 1300 hits from Redmond alone :)

    Rob

  66. Robert – I don’t think so. Since you linked to my blog earlier this week I have had thousands of visitors I would not have had – from all corners of the earth. 1300 hits from Redmond alone :)

    Rob

  67. 1. Write about stuff that’s relevant to you.
    Don’t blog about blogging, or bloggers or anything else terribly meta. Just pretend there’s absolutely nothing new, exciting or unusual about the process of blogging. Instead, write like you’re telling your friend about something cool you’ve found (50%), or like you’re having a nice chat with yourself (50%).
    That includes not worrying about what you listeners think – they’re your friends after all, right?

    2. Figuring out what’s relevant means getting rid of everything that isn’t.
    This may well include 70-80% of your email, though I suspect you get more interesting stuff than me.

    3. Focus.
    Talking about something coherently means not talking about a million other things. Tough luck. It’s called the blogosphere for a reason, those other guys want to come up with something interesting too from time to time.

    4. Don’t burn out.
    Sit back and take a deep breath. If you went hiking in the Rockies now for a week, web 2.0, the blogosphere and the tech industry would still be there once you came back. Provided that you still felt like writing and talking about that stuff, nothing at all would have changed.

    It’s that simple.

  68. 1. Write about stuff that’s relevant to you.
    Don’t blog about blogging, or bloggers or anything else terribly meta. Just pretend there’s absolutely nothing new, exciting or unusual about the process of blogging. Instead, write like you’re telling your friend about something cool you’ve found (50%), or like you’re having a nice chat with yourself (50%).
    That includes not worrying about what you listeners think – they’re your friends after all, right?

    2. Figuring out what’s relevant means getting rid of everything that isn’t.
    This may well include 70-80% of your email, though I suspect you get more interesting stuff than me.

    3. Focus.
    Talking about something coherently means not talking about a million other things. Tough luck. It’s called the blogosphere for a reason, those other guys want to come up with something interesting too from time to time.

    4. Don’t burn out.
    Sit back and take a deep breath. If you went hiking in the Rockies now for a week, web 2.0, the blogosphere and the tech industry would still be there once you came back. Provided that you still felt like writing and talking about that stuff, nothing at all would have changed.

    It’s that simple.

  69. The long tail has hit the blogosphere itself I guess

    And people are using more aggregators and keeping track of blogs that interest them

    Now there are a lot more journalists, sales guys, PR folks apart from techies who are blogging. In fact in the list of most linked Indian bloggers the technoloogy bloggers are probably less than 10%.

  70. The long tail has hit the blogosphere itself I guess

    And people are using more aggregators and keeping track of blogs that interest them

    Now there are a lot more journalists, sales guys, PR folks apart from techies who are blogging. In fact in the list of most linked Indian bloggers the technoloogy bloggers are probably less than 10%.

  71. I think you need more focus, more filtering that gets you to the real dope.

    But you have a few issues because of the shear quantity hitiing your listening channels.

    Sounds like you have an itch to scratch, remember the open source adage scratch that itch for yourself.

    I would move away from the old school email as it is highly inefficient for these sort of quantities.

    I would also think about using your community to help create a social software that helps filter your (public) incoming information feeds. Create a companion site dedicated to this filtering have your community vote/rate on incoming streams based on categories, let the social effects move the interesting stuff to the top and then concetrate on those. A kind of social blog where the subject matter is decided by the adience/community.

    ‘Use the force Robert’

    good luck
    regards
    Al

  72. I think you need more focus, more filtering that gets you to the real dope.

    But you have a few issues because of the shear quantity hitiing your listening channels.

    Sounds like you have an itch to scratch, remember the open source adage scratch that itch for yourself.

    I would move away from the old school email as it is highly inefficient for these sort of quantities.

    I would also think about using your community to help create a social software that helps filter your (public) incoming information feeds. Create a companion site dedicated to this filtering have your community vote/rate on incoming streams based on categories, let the social effects move the interesting stuff to the top and then concetrate on those. A kind of social blog where the subject matter is decided by the adience/community.

    ‘Use the force Robert’

    good luck
    regards
    Al

  73. 1. I think you already know what’s important for you to do right now. (Nike slogan goes here). Just in case you want more kibbitzing…
    2. I think LayZ has it nailed: GTD
    3. It’s not you, it’s the bubble. We’re close to (beyond?) saturation point with incremental me-too variations aimed at solving the same small number of problems. The payoff for your readers in checking them all out is diminishing. Point only to things that deliver exceptional new value.
    4. The audience for a “Tech Geek Blogger” might be a subset of the audience for a “Microsoft Geek Blogger.”– or it might be the same audience, but with diminished interest.
    5. You have a finite amount of you to invest–you’re going to need to allocate carefully between the thing you built (this blog) and the thing you’re building (your show and PodTech). Granted, there are synergies and the two things can nourish each other, but that only makes it easier to avoid making the required choices. As you say video takes a lot more time than text. Therefore…

  74. 1. I think you already know what’s important for you to do right now. (Nike slogan goes here). Just in case you want more kibbitzing…
    2. I think LayZ has it nailed: GTD
    3. It’s not you, it’s the bubble. We’re close to (beyond?) saturation point with incremental me-too variations aimed at solving the same small number of problems. The payoff for your readers in checking them all out is diminishing. Point only to things that deliver exceptional new value.
    4. The audience for a “Tech Geek Blogger” might be a subset of the audience for a “Microsoft Geek Blogger.”– or it might be the same audience, but with diminished interest.
    5. You have a finite amount of you to invest–you’re going to need to allocate carefully between the thing you built (this blog) and the thing you’re building (your show and PodTech). Granted, there are synergies and the two things can nourish each other, but that only makes it easier to avoid making the required choices. As you say video takes a lot more time than text. Therefore…

  75. Robert,

    Don’t be so hard on yourself. You’re still as great a blogger as ever. It’s not you.

    It’s the BRAND.

    Before, you were the uncensored voice of Microsoft. You were more than the fly on the wall of MS. You were the guy who let the world know all the cool things MS was doing, and a lot of the stuff they weren’t. Who else could ask for Flickr in Redmond or tell us the real deal on Origami?

    The same thing would happen to Matt Cutts — another fantastic blogger whose popularity correlates directly to his role at Google. Take Matt out of the plex and he would still write great stuff and do videos on SEO. A big part of his appeal, though, is his ability to provide the real scoop on Big Daddy and tap into the massive Google Brain Trust. You’ve got a tougher road than, say, journalists who leave a major daily because their sources don’t dry up.

    It’s really tough to scoop someone who’s 100% dedicated to getting a story in the mass media — or a Drudge-like “blog-as-business.” Plus, they can guarantee their sources wide distribution and in most cases syndication. You’ve got a business to run now and I’m sure revenue targets to meet as a direct result of your daily efforts.

    You and Matt have created your own brands and have a group of readers who will continue to follow you no matter where you go or what you do.

    You’re like any player who gets traded by the Yankees. In pinstripes, they’re the guys everybody loves to hate. Once out of the hated Yankees uniform, they can still be great players but they’re not going to generate the same buzz in the media.

    I may be wrong, but to find out, let’s check in with Alex Rodriguez in a few years. In pinstripes, he’s the most hated player in baseball even by his own fans. A day doesn’t go by when he’s not under the microscope in a way he never was as a lone Ranger.

  76. Robert,

    Don’t be so hard on yourself. You’re still as great a blogger as ever. It’s not you.

    It’s the BRAND.

    Before, you were the uncensored voice of Microsoft. You were more than the fly on the wall of MS. You were the guy who let the world know all the cool things MS was doing, and a lot of the stuff they weren’t. Who else could ask for Flickr in Redmond or tell us the real deal on Origami?

    The same thing would happen to Matt Cutts — another fantastic blogger whose popularity correlates directly to his role at Google. Take Matt out of the plex and he would still write great stuff and do videos on SEO. A big part of his appeal, though, is his ability to provide the real scoop on Big Daddy and tap into the massive Google Brain Trust. You’ve got a tougher road than, say, journalists who leave a major daily because their sources don’t dry up.

    It’s really tough to scoop someone who’s 100% dedicated to getting a story in the mass media — or a Drudge-like “blog-as-business.” Plus, they can guarantee their sources wide distribution and in most cases syndication. You’ve got a business to run now and I’m sure revenue targets to meet as a direct result of your daily efforts.

    You and Matt have created your own brands and have a group of readers who will continue to follow you no matter where you go or what you do.

    You’re like any player who gets traded by the Yankees. In pinstripes, they’re the guys everybody loves to hate. Once out of the hated Yankees uniform, they can still be great players but they’re not going to generate the same buzz in the media.

    I may be wrong, but to find out, let’s check in with Alex Rodriguez in a few years. In pinstripes, he’s the most hated player in baseball even by his own fans. A day doesn’t go by when he’s not under the microscope in a way he never was as a lone Ranger.

  77. […] Robert Scoble, se demande s’il n’a pas perdu son « blog power ». Pourquoi cette question ? Tout simplement parce qu’un blogueur indien s’est rendu compte que le lien de Robert Scoble dans son blog ne lui avait pas amené beaucoup de visiteurs. Le même lien quelques mois plus tôt avait fait exploser son trafic. Effectivement il y a que quoi se poser des questions. […]

  78. Robert,

    I’m sorry but our influence largely comes from the people we keep company with. When you were with Microsoft, you were a window (pun intended) into the inside of Microsoft. Now? Microsoft does have many other blogs, but they have a very “corporate” feel. Yours did not. Now you represent a very small company that may or may not have an impact in the near future.

    I am sad to say that I don’t much care about what your new employer is doing. Video is video. It’s the content that matters of course. Podcasting isn’t yet doing things I care about, and that does make you somewhat less interesting to me. That’s a PITY.

  79. Robert,

    I’m sorry but our influence largely comes from the people we keep company with. When you were with Microsoft, you were a window (pun intended) into the inside of Microsoft. Now? Microsoft does have many other blogs, but they have a very “corporate” feel. Yours did not. Now you represent a very small company that may or may not have an impact in the near future.

    I am sad to say that I don’t much care about what your new employer is doing. Video is video. It’s the content that matters of course. Podcasting isn’t yet doing things I care about, and that does make you somewhat less interesting to me. That’s a PITY.