How to do geek shirts and stickers right

When PodTech made T-Shirts, I remember Maryam making sure that we had lots of smaller sizes. When we went to London she packed a bunch of these smaller sizes. And when we were at the London Girl Geek Dinner she handed them out and made sure the men didn’t get any. Hmmm, sounds like she’s following Kathy Sierra’s advice. Truth is, so many conferences only make XL sizes available. Marketers should read the comments on Kathy’s blog post. It’s right on, as usually Kathy’s advice is!

I just donated six bags of T-shirts (hundreds of shirts) to Goodwill. Which ones did I keep? The ones that look nice on me and/or have brand names that I like and are tastefully presented. My Firefox shirt, for instance, is a favorite (I wore it on the Google videos).

Anyway,  that reminds me of another pet peeve.

Every interview I do I ask for stickers. Why?  Here’s a picture of my tripod. I love marketing stickers. So do many people, based on the laptops I’ve been seeing lately show up to conferences. Check out this Flickr page for a bunch of good examples of stickered up laptops.

What advice do I have to get a sticker on my laptop and/or tripod?

Give me various sizes, particularly smaller ones. And if your logo is obscure, give me your URL too. Even better, make it two separate stickers so I can stick your URL over your logo. Jeff Sandquist sent me some Channel 9 stickers and they are simply too big. What happens with stickers that are too big? We cut them apart, which reduces their effectiveness. Heheh, I’m putting a Channel 9 guy on my new Mac, except it’ll just be a head.

Make something different and make it so that if you get a one on the back of a laptop and get it up on Flickr that you can actually see the logo.

Oh, and make sure your service rocks. I paste over stickers from services that don’t deliver the goods and/or that don’t remain cool.

For instance, I want a Twitter sticker. Why? Cause that’s cool. Linked In? Not cool.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. OMG, after seeing those flickr pictures with stickers on them…I’m going to start decorating my laptop. It’s like graffiti art…almost.

    Maybe you can sell stickers? I wonder how many people would buy it. I would to decorate my laptop after seeing those flickr pictures

  2. OMG, after seeing those flickr pictures with stickers on them…I’m going to start decorating my laptop. It’s like graffiti art…almost.

    Maybe you can sell stickers? I wonder how many people would buy it. I would to decorate my laptop after seeing those flickr pictures

  3. It doesn’t really cost much or require much additional effort to produce women’s shirts. We do it every year at Northern Voice, which is pretty much required as nearly half our attendees are women.

    We made a related mistake in our first year, and over-estimated the size of the average male geek. It turns out they don’t fit the chair-bound-and-pudgy stereotype.

  4. It doesn’t really cost much or require much additional effort to produce women’s shirts. We do it every year at Northern Voice, which is pretty much required as nearly half our attendees are women.

    We made a related mistake in our first year, and over-estimated the size of the average male geek. It turns out they don’t fit the chair-bound-and-pudgy stereotype.

  5. People always ask us where we get our t-shirts, stickers, buttons, postcards, etc. made. It took a long time to find reliable vendors, so I posted them. I even posted the sizing breakdown we do for our t-shirt orders.

    http://www.spideysenses.com/2006/01/22/recommendations_tshirt_button_sticker_postcard/

    I feel like we spent as much time on our t-shirts as we did incorporating Dogster, Inc. Sounds like hyperbole, to keep your t-shirts out of Goodwill, ou gotta put the right effort into them.

  6. People always ask us where we get our t-shirts, stickers, buttons, postcards, etc. made. It took a long time to find reliable vendors, so I posted them. I even posted the sizing breakdown we do for our t-shirt orders.

    http://www.spideysenses.com/2006/01/22/recommendations_tshirt_button_sticker_postcard/

    I feel like we spent as much time on our t-shirts as we did incorporating Dogster, Inc. Sounds like hyperbole, to keep your t-shirts out of Goodwill, ou gotta put the right effort into them.

  7. I can’t believe you still do this sticker thing. Looks like the door of my room when I was 7. Stop.

    All your nice gear covered with silly stickers. ;-)

  8. I can’t believe you still do this sticker thing. Looks like the door of my room when I was 7. Stop.

    All your nice gear covered with silly stickers. ;-)

  9. Buttons are great at shows, but they invariably get tossed at the end of a show. Stickers “stick” around on the backs of laptops and on tripods and other places. Shirts get worn, if they aren’t too geeky looking.

  10. Buttons are great at shows, but they invariably get tossed at the end of a show. Stickers “stick” around on the backs of laptops and on tripods and other places. Shirts get worn, if they aren’t too geeky looking.

  11. Thanks Scobleizer, we've just released our new sticker template with 7 different sizes.
    Customizable Twitter Stickers.
    We promise, we'll try and stay cool!

  12. Thanks Scobleizer, we've just released our new sticker template with 7 different sizes.
    Customizable Twitter Stickers.
    We promise, we'll try and stay cool!