Which blog search engine is covering Demo best?

This morning I started comparing the various blog search engines on which one is doing best at bringing you the best news from the Demo conference.

One thing that bugs me about blog search is still every engine is showing spam, but Technorati seems to have less spam. Anyway, I just visited all the engines and Google Blog search is doing a better job.

What engine is winning in your judgment? Do you agree/disagree that Google is winning here?

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. There’s one area where Google wins big-time over Technorati: and that’s how fast they update their indexes after you’ve pinged them.

    If someone manually pings Technorati, then it almost always seems to take a really long time for them update their indexes so that your blog shows up when people search. It can be hours even.

    Whereas, if someone pings Google Blog Search, then Google updates their indexes in just a few minutes, so that your entry shows up in searches.

    The bottom line seems to be – you can pretty much forget searching on Technorati if you care about truly up-to-the minute stuff…

  2. My (totally unscientific, anecdotal) results have lead me to the following conclusion: blogs that are part of networks (and/or are listed on lots of blog rolls, etc.) seem to come up first and be indexed faster on technorati, whereas google blogsearch seems to be less concerned with trackbacks and links, and preferences the total relevance of the sites’ posts and content (wholesale) –instead of the search terms in any one given post. Google also seems less concerned with ranking the most recent post first (in a search results list) and more apt to rank the post that has the most search terms in the post, even if those terms are repeated frequently.

    So when I’m searching, I look to technorati for the most popular/established bloggers’ opinions on a given topic/trend/event; google blogsearch I use for unconventional wisdom, or hard-to-find facts as it often offers more precision in locating particular posts (even if they’re by less popular bloggers), based on the search term.

    Finally, these days I rely less on these blog search engines in seeking information vs. just reviewing the google reader blog headlines of the sites I trust. (kind of embarrassing to admit, but true…esp when I’m insanely busy).

    Do you have any info on what algorithms the different blog search engines use, robert?

  3. There’s one area where Google wins big-time over Technorati: and that’s how fast they update their indexes after you’ve pinged them.

    If someone manually pings Technorati, then it almost always seems to take a really long time for them update their indexes so that your blog shows up when people search. It can be hours even.

    Whereas, if someone pings Google Blog Search, then Google updates their indexes in just a few minutes, so that your entry shows up in searches.

    The bottom line seems to be – you can pretty much forget searching on Technorati if you care about truly up-to-the minute stuff…

  4. My (totally unscientific, anecdotal) results have lead me to the following conclusion: blogs that are part of networks (and/or are listed on lots of blog rolls, etc.) seem to come up first and be indexed faster on technorati, whereas google blogsearch seems to be less concerned with trackbacks and links, and preferences the total relevance of the sites’ posts and content (wholesale) –instead of the search terms in any one given post. Google also seems less concerned with ranking the most recent post first (in a search results list) and more apt to rank the post that has the most search terms in the post, even if those terms are repeated frequently.

    So when I’m searching, I look to technorati for the most popular/established bloggers’ opinions on a given topic/trend/event; google blogsearch I use for unconventional wisdom, or hard-to-find facts as it often offers more precision in locating particular posts (even if they’re by less popular bloggers), based on the search term.

    Finally, these days I rely less on these blog search engines in seeking information vs. just reviewing the google reader blog headlines of the sites I trust. (kind of embarrassing to admit, but true…esp when I’m insanely busy).

    Do you have any info on what algorithms the different blog search engines use, robert?

  5. I’ve also been noticing that Google’s blog search is rapidly improving. Both in speed and result relevancy. Technorati is slow.

  6. I’ve also been noticing that Google’s blog search is rapidly improving. Both in speed and result relevancy. Technorati is slow.

  7. Adding to the unscientific voices, I’ve noticed a lot more traffic from Google Blogsearch in recent weeks. From roughly a 10:1 ratio in favor of Technorati, recently Google is probably ahead. Most of the traffic from Technorati is from Tags, not search. I am not sure if it is because Google is giving better results, but it definitely catches them faster.

  8. Adding to the unscientific voices, I’ve noticed a lot more traffic from Google Blogsearch in recent weeks. From roughly a 10:1 ratio in favor of Technorati, recently Google is probably ahead. Most of the traffic from Technorati is from Tags, not search. I am not sure if it is because Google is giving better results, but it definitely catches them faster.

  9. I’ve always preferred Google Blog Search, it’s the most up-to-date and returns the most accurate results. It also has the trademark “clean” Google interface, whereas Technorati is a mess.

    I’ve always wondered why Google Blog Search doesn’t get more love. It’s not as if Google isn’t viewed as being “cool”. Maybe Technorati is just “cooler”.

  10. I’ve always preferred Google Blog Search, it’s the most up-to-date and returns the most accurate results. It also has the trademark “clean” Google interface, whereas Technorati is a mess.

    I’ve always wondered why Google Blog Search doesn’t get more love. It’s not as if Google isn’t viewed as being “cool”. Maybe Technorati is just “cooler”.

  11. Megan – “Google also seems less concerned with ranking the most recent post first (in a search results list) and more apt to rank the post that has the most search terms in the post” – just click “sort by date” if you want to see latest-first on Google.

  12. Megan – “Google also seems less concerned with ranking the most recent post first (in a search results list) and more apt to rank the post that has the most search terms in the post” – just click “sort by date” if you want to see latest-first on Google.

  13. Since searching, monitoring and tracking blog mentions for our clients is about 50% of what we do these days, we’ve spent alot of time evaluating the various blog search tools. We used to rely on commercial services like CustomScoop and Cyberalert, but we found that Google and Technorati were actually the most comprehensive.

  14. Since searching, monitoring and tracking blog mentions for our clients is about 50% of what we do these days, we’ve spent alot of time evaluating the various blog search tools. We used to rely on commercial services like CustomScoop and Cyberalert, but we found that Google and Technorati were actually the most comprehensive.

  15. Like Katie, I regularly research public commentary. Deepak had an interesting observation about inbound referrers showing overall consumer preferences. Like Robert, I’m dismayed at how all the engines still include so many scammers raking in ad revenue on words written by others.

    One additional problem is that no engine seems to have a lock on all the *real* weblogs out there… each misses real posts while presenting fake posts.

    Google Blogsearch is the one I reach for first these days, simply for the speed of the server. (Adding “&scoring=d” in the URL switches results to time order.) Technorati is the next hit, and for important issues I’ll crosscheck with 4-5 other engines. But I’ll still be surprised by what turns up on Digg… the search engines help, but don’t tell me what I need.

    For charting, Technorati and Blogpulse are usually in rough alignment, but each is counting fake blogs, and not counting all the real blogs.

    Google News has similar problems to blogsearch now… if you’re looking for new news articles you have to weed through pages of AP or Reuters copies from each hometown paper… pulling together popular commentary seems harder than it should be.

    jd/adobe

  16. Like Katie, I regularly research public commentary. Deepak had an interesting observation about inbound referrers showing overall consumer preferences. Like Robert, I’m dismayed at how all the engines still include so many scammers raking in ad revenue on words written by others.

    One additional problem is that no engine seems to have a lock on all the *real* weblogs out there… each misses real posts while presenting fake posts.

    Google Blogsearch is the one I reach for first these days, simply for the speed of the server. (Adding “&scoring=d” in the URL switches results to time order.) Technorati is the next hit, and for important issues I’ll crosscheck with 4-5 other engines. But I’ll still be surprised by what turns up on Digg… the search engines help, but don’t tell me what I need.

    For charting, Technorati and Blogpulse are usually in rough alignment, but each is counting fake blogs, and not counting all the real blogs.

    Google News has similar problems to blogsearch now… if you’re looking for new news articles you have to weed through pages of AP or Reuters copies from each hometown paper… pulling together popular commentary seems harder than it should be.

    jd/adobe

  17. Hands down — Google blog search is winning. We’ve been searching for posts about SplashCast pretty consistently here at DEMO. Between 25 and 50 percent of the time Technorati seems to be down. Google blog search also seems to have speedier indexing.

  18. Hands down — Google blog search is winning. We’ve been searching for posts about SplashCast pretty consistently here at DEMO. Between 25 and 50 percent of the time Technorati seems to be down. Google blog search also seems to have speedier indexing.

  19. Even though I am new at this blogging stuff, I have found Google picks up searches much faster than Technorati. Google even picks up stuff from “z” listers like myself where technorati hasn’t yet.

  20. Even though I am new at this blogging stuff, I have found Google picks up searches much faster than Technorati. Google even picks up stuff from “z” listers like myself where technorati hasn’t yet.