The most expensive pocket digital camera?

Guido Van Nispen makes the expensive Canon 5D that Thomas Hawk uses look cheap. He is shooting the LIFT conference on a Leica with a 50mm f1.0 lens. Results? Fabulous. Price? Around $10,000 for body and lens. Whew!

He caught an image of me shooting expensive watches yesterday. Disadvantage of such a fast lens? Depth of field is only a couple of centimeters, he says, which makes it hard to get a sharp image.

Maybe we should do a Photowalking here in Geneva with him?

Speaking of Photowalking, I hear the video of our walk around the Sacramento Train Museum will be up tomorrow or Friday on the ScobleShow. As for LIFT, I’ll put the best stuff up on my link blog (which I have been keeping up to date even while being a tourist in Europe). Or, you can follow along on the LIFT blog.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. I would say it’s not the camera but the person behind it.
    Put that camera in one of our hands and you still have snapshots ;-)
    ———-
    I remember when Poloroid came out with their Poloroid back for studio photographers (to shoot previews). In the hands of us meer mortals, all Poloroids looked like vacation snapshots. Poloroid hired pros to shoot demo shots and because they were pros, they knew lighting, composition, etc. and their shots were gorgous, you couldn’t tell they were Poloroids.

  2. I would say it’s not the camera but the person behind it.
    Put that camera in one of our hands and you still have snapshots ;-)
    ———-
    I remember when Poloroid came out with their Poloroid back for studio photographers (to shoot previews). In the hands of us meer mortals, all Poloroids looked like vacation snapshots. Poloroid hired pros to shoot demo shots and because they were pros, they knew lighting, composition, etc. and their shots were gorgous, you couldn’t tell they were Poloroids.

  3. Sorry if I double posted…as the notice said…but, none of the comments beyond the first (#1) are showing up (for me anyway) even on refresh or clearing my cache. So I’m assuming it’s something gone bonkers on your end :-)

  4. Sorry if I double posted…as the notice said…but, none of the comments beyond the first (#1) are showing up (for me anyway) even on refresh or clearing my cache. So I’m assuming it’s something gone bonkers on your end :-)

  5. Ok, I’ll try this comment without the links and see if it works.
    ———-

    Robert…Since this happens to be a photog post and I know you’re always behind on your email, thought I’d post this here.
    ———-
    Having been in the design business so long, I’ve had the pleasure of working with a lot of photographers (hence a strong interest) with different styles/approaches for various types of assignments. Been following your photowalking and when it takes place in a specific location, it reminds me of the way National Geographic photographers work…shoot thousands of photographs and edit for the best.
    Here’s a different approach by a former NG photographer you might enjoy…just one shot a day, no editing, make it a good one. You have to have (or develop) a very discerning eye… Jim Brandenburg…Chased By The Light…
    Book is on Amazon and you can Google his site.
    ———-
    Jim is a fellow Minnesotan and our paths have crossed several times…he played in a 60’s rock band (The StarFires) headed up by a guy from my hometown they were inducted into the MN Rock hall of fame around the same time as my band (The Marauders). Don’t know him well but is a very nice guy.

  6. Ok, I’ll try this comment without the links and see if it works.
    ———-

    Robert…Since this happens to be a photog post and I know you’re always behind on your email, thought I’d post this here.
    ———-
    Having been in the design business so long, I’ve had the pleasure of working with a lot of photographers (hence a strong interest) with different styles/approaches for various types of assignments. Been following your photowalking and when it takes place in a specific location, it reminds me of the way National Geographic photographers work…shoot thousands of photographs and edit for the best.
    Here’s a different approach by a former NG photographer you might enjoy…just one shot a day, no editing, make it a good one. You have to have (or develop) a very discerning eye… Jim Brandenburg…Chased By The Light…
    Book is on Amazon and you can Google his site.
    ———-
    Jim is a fellow Minnesotan and our paths have crossed several times…he played in a 60’s rock band (The StarFires) headed up by a guy from my hometown they were inducted into the MN Rock hall of fame around the same time as my band (The Marauders). Don’t know him well but is a very nice guy.

  7. Unless I’m missing something this doesn’t sound like what I’d call a “pocket” camera. Can you give more details? I’ve recently gone back to a full sized SLR (digital of course) after making do with one of the pocket digital cameras for a few years.

    At first when I dumped my 35mm SLR for digital I was sure that all SLRs would be obsolete soon. That obviously hasn’t happened and I’m doubtful that the reason has anything too do with technology, as opposed to profit margins. So now I have a nice digital camera with a lot of complex moving parts that can go wrong at any moment.

    It’s sort of like if they came up with digital watches and realizing the price was going to go into the double digits hastily re-introduced the winding stem and “seventeen jewel movements” behind the digital display.

  8. Unless I’m missing something this doesn’t sound like what I’d call a “pocket” camera. Can you give more details? I’ve recently gone back to a full sized SLR (digital of course) after making do with one of the pocket digital cameras for a few years.

    At first when I dumped my 35mm SLR for digital I was sure that all SLRs would be obsolete soon. That obviously hasn’t happened and I’m doubtful that the reason has anything too do with technology, as opposed to profit margins. So now I have a nice digital camera with a lot of complex moving parts that can go wrong at any moment.

    It’s sort of like if they came up with digital watches and realizing the price was going to go into the double digits hastily re-introduced the winding stem and “seventeen jewel movements” behind the digital display.

  9. Ya know, if you don’t know how to change the aperture, you have no business using a $10,000 camera. Just a thought.

  10. Ya know, if you don’t know how to change the aperture, you have no business using a $10,000 camera. Just a thought.

  11. When you’re shooting with low light, you make choices about what’s in focus and what’s not.

    I thought having the Podtech logo in focus, and you a bit fuzzy worked fine. The shot reminds me of my first camera, an Olympus OM-1 with a 1.4 50mm lens. Loved that camera while I was learning how to compose photos…

  12. When you’re shooting with low light, you make choices about what’s in focus and what’s not.

    I thought having the Podtech logo in focus, and you a bit fuzzy worked fine. The shot reminds me of my first camera, an Olympus OM-1 with a 1.4 50mm lens. Loved that camera while I was learning how to compose photos…

  13. Hi, the photos look a little bit too “soft” (lack of contrast), but I guess that’s the photographers choice.
    Still I think that the Canon 5D with the amazingly beautiful new 50mm 1.2 (incredible precision and very elegant bouquet) has nothing to envy to Leica.

  14. Hi, the photos look a little bit too “soft” (lack of contrast), but I guess that’s the photographers choice.
    Still I think that the Canon 5D with the amazingly beautiful new 50mm 1.2 (incredible precision and very elegant bouquet) has nothing to envy to Leica.

  15. Speaking of PhotoWalking, thanks to you, I’ve forked it off to create PhotoCommuting, and my world is already more richer. Thanks!

    http://blog.yuvisense.net/2007/02/08/photocommute-from-school-back-to-home/

    And, sorry about the delay in the Engadget vs Gizmodo post: I learnt a valuble lesson that Joel’s been advocating for a long time(“Never rewrite working code”). So, I’m starting off with the same base I used for your blog’s analysis, and I expect to publish it by next week….

  16. Speaking of PhotoWalking, thanks to you, I’ve forked it off to create PhotoCommuting, and my world is already more richer. Thanks!

    http://blog.yuvisense.net/2007/02/08/photocommute-from-school-back-to-home/

    And, sorry about the delay in the Engadget vs Gizmodo post: I learnt a valuble lesson that Joel’s been advocating for a long time(“Never rewrite working code”). So, I’m starting off with the same base I used for your blog’s analysis, and I expect to publish it by next week….

  17. A Leica M8 with a Noctilux lens attached isn’t a pocket camera by any stretch of the imagination. The body alone, though smaller than your average (D)SLR, is larger than most film Leica M bodies (the M5 may be a little bigger) and the Noctilux lens is unusually large for a 50mm prime, due to the wide aperture and complex lens geometry. In short, your headline is sheer hyperbole. Readers may draw their own conclusions; I personally like “…but that’s hardly surprising.”

  18. A Leica M8 with a Noctilux lens attached isn’t a pocket camera by any stretch of the imagination. The body alone, though smaller than your average (D)SLR, is larger than most film Leica M bodies (the M5 may be a little bigger) and the Noctilux lens is unusually large for a 50mm prime, due to the wide aperture and complex lens geometry. In short, your headline is sheer hyperbole. Readers may draw their own conclusions; I personally like “…but that’s hardly surprising.”

  19. ..there was some months ago a piece of research news that either took the exposed image and re-focused it in several layers or used several exposures [as with hdr high dynamic range] but have not been able to trace it

  20. ..there was some months ago a piece of research news that either took the exposed image and re-focused it in several layers or used several exposures [as with hdr high dynamic range] but have not been able to trace it

  21. oooohhhh!!! u know so expensive dat camera its like its not camera……

    its the people who takes picture not the price of da camera but…. i like expensive ones

  22. oooohhhh!!! u know so expensive dat camera its like its not camera……

    its the people who takes picture not the price of da camera but…. i like expensive ones