Praise for JavaFX

Adrian Sutton saw I invited everyone to the Marriott and showed up. He’s a Java-using developer from Australia and was visiting for the JavaOne conference last week. Actually he’s a senior software engineer at Ephox. I love Twitter and it always amazes me when people show up because they see me Twittering about something.

Anyway, he told Tom and I that he was very impressed with JavaFX and what he saw at JavaOne this week. Although he doesn’t think JavaFX is a Flash killer. He thinks it is something else, but something that software developers will find useful.

Funny, I was wearing a Microsoft Silverlight hat that Jeff Sandquist gave me. On the elevator on the way down some guy gave me a dirty look and pulled out a Java hat and put it on. Ahh, this is how geek religions are displayed and fought.

The guy was John Penrose, principal architect in the enterprise group at Cablevision. After we had a laugh about the hat we talked briefly. He said he was very impressed with JavaFX and said the demos were absolutely killer, especially the mobile ones.

Reading the blog’s reactions to JavaFX (on Google’s blog search) (and same search on Technorati) it seems most of them are very positive. How about you? What do you think?

Comments

  1. Actually, I think JavaFX isn’t the real story here (although, it’s what the media and bloggers have picked up on). The real story is that Sun is attempting to fix the browser Java runtime (JRE) with an all-new “Consumer JRE”.

    I’ve written in detail on this on my blog:

    http://www.psynixis.com/blog/2007/05/09/prediction-for-2008-the-return-of-the-java-applet/

    The point is: JavaFX will be an enabler that lets graphic designers and “web developer” types get involved in Java. That’s great. However, it’s the new Consumer JRE that could be the Flash killer…

  2. Actually, I think JavaFX isn’t the real story here (although, it’s what the media and bloggers have picked up on). The real story is that Sun is attempting to fix the browser Java runtime (JRE) with an all-new “Consumer JRE”.

    I’ve written in detail on this on my blog:

    http://www.psynixis.com/blog/2007/05/09/prediction-for-2008-the-return-of-the-java-applet/

    The point is: JavaFX will be an enabler that lets graphic designers and “web developer” types get involved in Java. That’s great. However, it’s the new Consumer JRE that could be the Flash killer…

  3. the problem with java is that Sun is reacting to both Adobe and MS at the very last moment, and that they are going to be in a place where they are not only going to compete with Adobe as i bet they thought it would be, but that they will be competing against MS too, something that don`t put`s them in a comfortable place to say the least..

  4. the problem with java is that Sun is reacting to both Adobe and MS at the very last moment, and that they are going to be in a place where they are not only going to compete with Adobe as i bet they thought it would be, but that they will be competing against MS too, something that don`t put`s them in a comfortable place to say the least..

  5. I’m a mobile dev, not a desktop dev, and from my world view, Java is the only credible solution for volume deployment. Flash (and M$) are nowhere. So if sun can figure out a way to extend my reach onto the desktop, while making it simpler to create flashy content (without yet another runtime dependency), good on them… they will get my vote. If you look at it from the desktop world, I guess I’d say they’re coming from behind. But there are more mobile phone users than desktop by a very long mile…

  6. I’m a mobile dev, not a desktop dev, and from my world view, Java is the only credible solution for volume deployment. Flash (and M$) are nowhere. So if sun can figure out a way to extend my reach onto the desktop, while making it simpler to create flashy content (without yet another runtime dependency), good on them… they will get my vote. If you look at it from the desktop world, I guess I’d say they’re coming from behind. But there are more mobile phone users than desktop by a very long mile…

  7. Dear Robert,

    I have had it out my various orifices with javascript, Web 2.0, CALEA, cookies, the NSA, Digg, flash, Vista, and who knows what else.

    I understand that there are data people and visual people, and want to allow for that. Unfortunately, page `designers’ don’t want to allow for me. I run Opera and Firefox; no cookies, no javascript, no flash. I can’t tell you the number of sites I literally can’t open because I don’t run the swiss cheese of browsers, IE.

    I don’t use Vista because I don’t want my OS to provide me with an `experience’ – I want it to run programs. I also don’t want my hardware dictated by my OS (nor do my 3,000+ coworkers).

    What’s a curmudgeon (but technically proficient geek) to do?

  8. Dear Robert,

    I have had it out my various orifices with javascript, Web 2.0, CALEA, cookies, the NSA, Digg, flash, Vista, and who knows what else.

    I understand that there are data people and visual people, and want to allow for that. Unfortunately, page `designers’ don’t want to allow for me. I run Opera and Firefox; no cookies, no javascript, no flash. I can’t tell you the number of sites I literally can’t open because I don’t run the swiss cheese of browsers, IE.

    I don’t use Vista because I don’t want my OS to provide me with an `experience’ – I want it to run programs. I also don’t want my hardware dictated by my OS (nor do my 3,000+ coworkers).

    What’s a curmudgeon (but technically proficient geek) to do?