Google isn’t the only one going offline…

Come back tomorrow for another company that’s going offline. I can’t say more until noon tomorrow, sorry.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. Um, why are they stopping at javascript?
    Why not install a lightweight PHP interpreter in the browser module?
    Why limit it to javascript API and static pages?
    Put a PHP interpreter right in the browser!
    That way you can put most of the dynamicism of a website offline.

    If I wasn’t managing employees everyday, and working on a next gen SQL server, I’d throw my hat in the ring. I love PHP. Offline AJAX with JS just still doesn’t cut it. Sorry.

    http://www.httrack.com/
    http://spiderzilla.mozdev.org/

    Otherwise, why not just use httrack. Maybe you threw a little API in there, but come on. Billions of dollars, and they won’t do client side interpreters for PHP. Zend won’t do it.

  2. Um, why are they stopping at javascript?
    Why not install a lightweight PHP interpreter in the browser module?
    Why limit it to javascript API and static pages?
    Put a PHP interpreter right in the browser!
    That way you can put most of the dynamicism of a website offline.

    If I wasn’t managing employees everyday, and working on a next gen SQL server, I’d throw my hat in the ring. I love PHP. Offline AJAX with JS just still doesn’t cut it. Sorry.

    http://www.httrack.com/
    http://spiderzilla.mozdev.org/

    Otherwise, why not just use httrack. Maybe you threw a little API in there, but come on. Billions of dollars, and they won’t do client side interpreters for PHP. Zend won’t do it.

  3. “because otherwise you wouldn’t know to be back here at noon, would you?”

    Er, there’s this marvellous new invention, I don’t know if you’ve heard of it…what’s it called…oh yes, RSS, that’s it.

    Seriously this is the dumbest post of the week :-)

    “I’ll be posting something cool tomorrow so be sure to come back!”
    “Uh, won’t it be in my RSS reader?”
    “Well, yeah, I *guess* you could do that…”

  4. “because otherwise you wouldn’t know to be back here at noon, would you?”

    Er, there’s this marvellous new invention, I don’t know if you’ve heard of it…what’s it called…oh yes, RSS, that’s it.

    Seriously this is the dumbest post of the week :-)

    “I’ll be posting something cool tomorrow so be sure to come back!”
    “Uh, won’t it be in my RSS reader?”
    “Well, yeah, I *guess* you could do that…”

  5. Gears is a start, but in the long run web developer will need some kind of local server that can handle web apps and automatically sync data back to the cloud when you reconnect. Last year I spoke to someone at Intel, they were thinking along the same lines (don’t know if they’re still in the game, though).

    A standardized package of, say, Ruby/PHP/MySQL/Webserver would be nice to have, and on top a lightweight framework that handles installation, updates and data synchronization. The downer here is the sheer size of that runtime (my guess is over 20MB even for a stripped down installer) and configuration issues. It would rock, but it’s probably not gonna happen.

  6. Gears is a start, but in the long run web developer will need some kind of local server that can handle web apps and automatically sync data back to the cloud when you reconnect. Last year I spoke to someone at Intel, they were thinking along the same lines (don’t know if they’re still in the game, though).

    A standardized package of, say, Ruby/PHP/MySQL/Webserver would be nice to have, and on top a lightweight framework that handles installation, updates and data synchronization. The downer here is the sheer size of that runtime (my guess is over 20MB even for a stripped down installer) and configuration issues. It would rock, but it’s probably not gonna happen.

  7. It has to be Microsoft, right? I mean, usually when a company announces something new you have Microsoft announcing the same thing the following day.

  8. It has to be Microsoft, right? I mean, usually when a company announces something new you have Microsoft announcing the same thing the following day.