Working on a Saturday?

Then you might want to watch my interview with Tim Ferriss. He’s the New York Times best selling author of “The 4-Hour Workweek” and we talk about the book and a little more about the kinds of things he’s discovered about living life productively.

OK, now you have a choice. Do you want to watch just the highlights, which will take you eight minutes? Or the full 50-minute dose of Tim? (He’s say watch the eight minute one and then get back to your weekend).

Or, if you are already on Tim’s plan, maybe you want to meet Samantha Murphy at the CES BlogHaus, our favorite indie singer — we met her at the PodCast Hotel last year in Seattle. In the interview we did with her she talks about the struggles of being an independent artist and what she’s hoping the music industry will do in the future.

I can’t wait until next year’s CES BlogHaus. We’re working on having fun people like Samantha there again.

Back to the interview with Tim, don’t miss the first few minutes where he explains how he became a New York Times best seller by mostly just talking with bloggers.

[podtech content=http://media1.podtech.net/media/2007/06/PID_011484/Podtech_TimFerriss.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/scobleshow/technology/1518/work-only-four-hours-a-week-with-tim-ferriss&totalTime=3022000&breadcrumb=67edc3bafd654da1ba6167fb157006e8]

Comments

  1. 8 minutes, is already too much. Insufferable, bombastic, con-artistry. Life is not a shortcut. But lottsa suckers out there…

    CES stuff? Bit late, eh? Clearing out the archives? Mary Jo Foley bumped that one if I recall. :)

  2. 8 minutes, is already too much. Insufferable, bombastic, con-artistry. Life is not a shortcut. But lottsa suckers out there…

    CES stuff? Bit late, eh? Clearing out the archives? Mary Jo Foley bumped that one if I recall. :)

  3. Christopher: yeah, we sorta forgot about that tape. Maryam asked me why we never ran it and I didn’t have a good excuse, so there you go.

    I disagree with you about Tim, but then I don’t follow his rules either. They are good to get you to evaluate whether or not you’re dealing with this stuff the best possible way, though.

    But then sometimes I think you’re a bit insufferable and bombastic, etc. :-)

  4. Christopher: yeah, we sorta forgot about that tape. Maryam asked me why we never ran it and I didn’t have a good excuse, so there you go.

    I disagree with you about Tim, but then I don’t follow his rules either. They are good to get you to evaluate whether or not you’re dealing with this stuff the best possible way, though.

    But then sometimes I think you’re a bit insufferable and bombastic, etc. :-)

  5. This is the first ScobleShow I’ve watched (mostly because I actually put down Tim’s book to go read some blogs for a bit, and this popped up!) I have to say that the video is pretty awkward. The camera is at a weird angle and seems to focus on your back. It’s hard to hear Tim, but you are mic’ed pretty loud. I had to keep adjusting the volume (down whenever you were talking, and up whenever Tim spoke.) I can’t see Tim’s face very clearly. I have to say I’d really prefer a transcript or a text summary (maybe hire some of those outsourcers Tim refers to to do this? :P) instead of watching this — especially since the camera angle doesn’t change.

    Still enjoy your blog, though. ;)

  6. This is the first ScobleShow I’ve watched (mostly because I actually put down Tim’s book to go read some blogs for a bit, and this popped up!) I have to say that the video is pretty awkward. The camera is at a weird angle and seems to focus on your back. It’s hard to hear Tim, but you are mic’ed pretty loud. I had to keep adjusting the volume (down whenever you were talking, and up whenever Tim spoke.) I can’t see Tim’s face very clearly. I have to say I’d really prefer a transcript or a text summary (maybe hire some of those outsourcers Tim refers to to do this? :P) instead of watching this — especially since the camera angle doesn’t change.

    Still enjoy your blog, though. ;)

  7. This guy is great! I’ve been interested in time management for years and have often written on it. To me, even if you side aside all his money making ideas (which are Great and very detailed), his time management techniques are worth the cost of the book.

    I’ve written a couple of posts on his book, such as
    The New Time Management Guru. The other one is about his goal-setting principles.

    By the way, he writes much better than he speaks, at least for his informal speaking.

  8. This guy is great! I’ve been interested in time management for years and have often written on it. To me, even if you side aside all his money making ideas (which are Great and very detailed), his time management techniques are worth the cost of the book.

    I’ve written a couple of posts on his book, such as
    The New Time Management Guru. The other one is about his goal-setting principles.

    By the way, he writes much better than he speaks, at least for his informal speaking.

  9. Slash: yeah, the camera angle is a bit weird. I don’t have the trouble with the audio, though. I have cheapass speakers, though, on my Sony Vaio. I’m a little loud, but that’s just me.

    The problem with internet video? There isn’t enough audience to pay for the things you ask (camera crew, audio engineer, and transcripts). Sorry. Just the facts of life.

  10. Slash: yeah, the camera angle is a bit weird. I don’t have the trouble with the audio, though. I have cheapass speakers, though, on my Sony Vaio. I’m a little loud, but that’s just me.

    The problem with internet video? There isn’t enough audience to pay for the things you ask (camera crew, audio engineer, and transcripts). Sorry. Just the facts of life.

  11. Robert, Tim Ferris should pay you big $$$ for propagating his book on your blog – I have seen you talking about it earier too!

    I like Tim’s talk about mobility and outsourcing etc but he is not coverinig important issue of patriotism: if you outsource your life and your work etc to India then fellow Americans are getting poorer and USA at the end is not producing anything. Too bad Tim neglects patriotism :-(

    Regarding camera angle: I don’t mind it, all in all good to see the Tim with face and gestures. Very good video, Robert.

  12. Robert, Tim Ferris should pay you big $$$ for propagating his book on your blog – I have seen you talking about it earier too!

    I like Tim’s talk about mobility and outsourcing etc but he is not coverinig important issue of patriotism: if you outsource your life and your work etc to India then fellow Americans are getting poorer and USA at the end is not producing anything. Too bad Tim neglects patriotism :-(

    Regarding camera angle: I don’t mind it, all in all good to see the Tim with face and gestures. Very good video, Robert.

  13. Comic Strip Blogger…

    Come on man, your comment doesn’t even really make sense. Going with the thoughts behind Tim’s philosophy if we outsourced the tasks we could, then USA would be wildly more productive because we wouldn’t be doing things that slow us down and are of lesser value to our time. And the reality of the internet and communications, and how small the world is, never outsourcing is unrealistic and short sighted.

    On a whole different level jobs that are outsourced to India are allowing that whole society to move out of oppressive situations where there are no other options except doing what generations of your family have done before you, to having a choice to provide for your family and move beyond crippling poverty. And when people are living well, and your business is part of the reason, they are less likely to cause you problems (i.e., terrorism) and they will actually help your business/economy prosper.

    Establishing good favor like that in countries around the world builds the United States up (i.e., a patriotic result) and increases our prosperity and having a narrow vision that pits “us” vs “them” does nothing but make enemies.

  14. Comic Strip Blogger…

    Come on man, your comment doesn’t even really make sense. Going with the thoughts behind Tim’s philosophy if we outsourced the tasks we could, then USA would be wildly more productive because we wouldn’t be doing things that slow us down and are of lesser value to our time. And the reality of the internet and communications, and how small the world is, never outsourcing is unrealistic and short sighted.

    On a whole different level jobs that are outsourced to India are allowing that whole society to move out of oppressive situations where there are no other options except doing what generations of your family have done before you, to having a choice to provide for your family and move beyond crippling poverty. And when people are living well, and your business is part of the reason, they are less likely to cause you problems (i.e., terrorism) and they will actually help your business/economy prosper.

    Establishing good favor like that in countries around the world builds the United States up (i.e., a patriotic result) and increases our prosperity and having a narrow vision that pits “us” vs “them” does nothing but make enemies.

  15. @Tony,

    I would 100% agree with your argument and it would make sense IF the poverty in US was conquered. According to US Census 44.8 Million people in US do not have health insurance 15.3% (http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/health_care_insurance/009789.html)
    Child poverty is 17.6%, Official Poverty Rate is 12.6%
    http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty05/pov05hi.html

    Besides other nations have problems precisely because of us meddling into their business. First take care of problems in your home before fixing problems in others…

    On the 4 hour work-week subject, I have read the book and while it has nice ideas (which are not new and are published already) is very unrealistic and is selling what people want to hear. Which shows how people actually get conned. Becouse in large part they want to…

    As idea 4-hour work-week is Utopian. Tim is smart guy and is just selling what people want to buy: Dream…

  16. @Tony,

    I would 100% agree with your argument and it would make sense IF the poverty in US was conquered. According to US Census 44.8 Million people in US do not have health insurance 15.3% (http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/health_care_insurance/009789.html)
    Child poverty is 17.6%, Official Poverty Rate is 12.6%
    http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty05/pov05hi.html

    Besides other nations have problems precisely because of us meddling into their business. First take care of problems in your home before fixing problems in others…

    On the 4 hour work-week subject, I have read the book and while it has nice ideas (which are not new and are published already) is very unrealistic and is selling what people want to hear. Which shows how people actually get conned. Becouse in large part they want to…

    As idea 4-hour work-week is Utopian. Tim is smart guy and is just selling what people want to buy: Dream…

  17. Hi Robert,

    I have to admit that I don’t understand all the fuss about the 4-hour work week.

    I work a 50 hour week. Sometime it goes into the 60s or 70s. You work from dusk till dawn. It’s also clear that this guy is not working a 4-hour week, If you add up the time he talked to you in the last month it adds to more than 4 hours/week. He must be doing 90 hour weeks for several months now, just to keep the publicity campaign going.

    So why should anyone buy this book, if it’s basic premise is false?

  18. Hi Robert,

    I have to admit that I don’t understand all the fuss about the 4-hour work week.

    I work a 50 hour week. Sometime it goes into the 60s or 70s. You work from dusk till dawn. It’s also clear that this guy is not working a 4-hour week, If you add up the time he talked to you in the last month it adds to more than 4 hours/week. He must be doing 90 hour weeks for several months now, just to keep the publicity campaign going.

    So why should anyone buy this book, if it’s basic premise is false?

  19. Good job – I really enjoyed the interview (listened to it as I addictively cleared my own inbox – sigh!). I had picked up Tim’s audiobook from audible which I would normally listen to at an amped 1.5x normal speed but I must say, the interview gave me “PAUSE”.

    I, too, gallop through thousands of filtered, spamarrested emails and other content daily with a breathless sense of urgency. I’ve amped my reading speed to 1200-1500 words a minute, I subscribe to Soundview Executive Summaries, I read your blog (smile), all strategies to “compress” time (all started with a triple expresso latte in the morning!)

    Now I’m hyper anyway, but would love to use the “force” for the urgent/important or Damn!!! Damn maybe a vacation?????!!

    So – today, I’ve just decided to find an offshore accounting resource to complete this week’s “fire” and harvest my sunday to visit my garden and listen to Tim’s book (at 1.00 speed)!! Thanks for the sanity check! : )

  20. Good job – I really enjoyed the interview (listened to it as I addictively cleared my own inbox – sigh!). I had picked up Tim’s audiobook from audible which I would normally listen to at an amped 1.5x normal speed but I must say, the interview gave me “PAUSE”.

    I, too, gallop through thousands of filtered, spamarrested emails and other content daily with a breathless sense of urgency. I’ve amped my reading speed to 1200-1500 words a minute, I subscribe to Soundview Executive Summaries, I read your blog (smile), all strategies to “compress” time (all started with a triple expresso latte in the morning!)

    Now I’m hyper anyway, but would love to use the “force” for the urgent/important or Damn!!! Damn maybe a vacation?????!!

    So – today, I’ve just decided to find an offshore accounting resource to complete this week’s “fire” and harvest my sunday to visit my garden and listen to Tim’s book (at 1.00 speed)!! Thanks for the sanity check! : )

  21. Yoav: if you really get underneath it the point isn’t to get to working only four hours a week. But it’s to spend your work time doing productive work that actually makes a difference to your customers, the world, to you, to your family.

    It’s valuable because it gets you to look at what you’re doing and see if there’s some changes you can make.

  22. Yoav: if you really get underneath it the point isn’t to get to working only four hours a week. But it’s to spend your work time doing productive work that actually makes a difference to your customers, the world, to you, to your family.

    It’s valuable because it gets you to look at what you’re doing and see if there’s some changes you can make.

  23. I guessed that much. But my point is there has to be truth in advertising (at least some). I sell productivity products and I don’t sell them with a “My products will enable you to work just 4 hours a week” headline and then say “well actually they just really increase your productivity”.

    IMO it’s misleading. It’s like that old advertisement that had the headline “S*X” and then said “Now that we have got your attention how bout them colleague courses”.

  24. I guessed that much. But my point is there has to be truth in advertising (at least some). I sell productivity products and I don’t sell them with a “My products will enable you to work just 4 hours a week” headline and then say “well actually they just really increase your productivity”.

    IMO it’s misleading. It’s like that old advertisement that had the headline “S*X” and then said “Now that we have got your attention how bout them colleague courses”.

  25. You don’t need a “camera crew” (just don’t aim the camera at your back) or an “audio engineer” (put mikes on all speakers and test the levels). Transcription is inexpensive and you know it.

  26. You don’t need a “camera crew” (just don’t aim the camera at your back) or an “audio engineer” (put mikes on all speakers and test the levels). Transcription is inexpensive and you know it.

  27. @3: France is in “economical” trouble, but it is more complicated than the “35hours a week-it is the problem”.
    Look at the USA and Italy, I am not sure their economic balance is good either.
    For France, one of the problem is that people are too easy to go for medicines, and the government pays back a lot of then, and some “health” cares which are not so “social” (therms for example).

    Moreover, not all companies are concerned by the 35hours week: it depends on the number of employees, and it was supposed to make companies hire people , and on the other side, this gives opportunity to employees to have more free time, and then to entertain (and to spend more money rather than saving).

  28. @3: France is in “economical” trouble, but it is more complicated than the “35hours a week-it is the problem”.
    Look at the USA and Italy, I am not sure their economic balance is good either.
    For France, one of the problem is that people are too easy to go for medicines, and the government pays back a lot of then, and some “health” cares which are not so “social” (therms for example).

    Moreover, not all companies are concerned by the 35hours week: it depends on the number of employees, and it was supposed to make companies hire people , and on the other side, this gives opportunity to employees to have more free time, and then to entertain (and to spend more money rather than saving).

  29. @11 “would 100% agree with your argument and it would make sense IF the poverty in US was conquered. According to US Census 44.8 Million people in US do not have health insurance 15.3% (http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/health_care_insurance/009789.html)
    Child poverty is 17.6%, Official Poverty Rate is 12.6%
    http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty05/pov

    What’s does that have to do with Tony’s point?

    As for the 44MM supposedly without health insurance, that would mean that close to 250MM HAVE some form of health insurance, right?

    How many of the 15.3% that supposedly don’t have health insurance are in that situation because they choose not to pay for it? And how many of those 44MM (it’s actually closer to 35MM and when we drill down more, may actually be closer to 12MM) are not citizens? It’s interesting to note that that 44MM statistic includes people that have gone without insurance for a short time…like being between jobs. How many of those 44MM have Medicaid but think they are not insured because they don’t think Medicaid qualifies as insurance? How many of those 44MM include people that ARE eligible for Medicaid but elect not to participate? How many of those 44MM are under 35? Meaning that many of them may be healthy and could afford to purchase health insurance if they wanted to? I remember when I was younger I thought I was invincible? Pay a monthly health premium? Not a chance! I have a car payment and partying to do. Finally, how many of those 44MM include people that can afford to self insure? The point is, throwing out the 44MM sounds like a major crisis, when in actuality the people need health insurance and truly can’t afford it may be considerably lower. My point is, let’s not let some questionable statistics cloud our policy making. Let’s note that the first country to have “universal health care” was the Soviet Union. And before it’s fall they were one of the few countries that had both a declining life span and a rising infant mortality rate. Explain how everyone having health insurance helped?

  30. @11 “would 100% agree with your argument and it would make sense IF the poverty in US was conquered. According to US Census 44.8 Million people in US do not have health insurance 15.3% (http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/health_care_insurance/009789.html)
    Child poverty is 17.6%, Official Poverty Rate is 12.6%
    http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty05/pov

    What’s does that have to do with Tony’s point?

    As for the 44MM supposedly without health insurance, that would mean that close to 250MM HAVE some form of health insurance, right?

    How many of the 15.3% that supposedly don’t have health insurance are in that situation because they choose not to pay for it? And how many of those 44MM (it’s actually closer to 35MM and when we drill down more, may actually be closer to 12MM) are not citizens? It’s interesting to note that that 44MM statistic includes people that have gone without insurance for a short time…like being between jobs. How many of those 44MM have Medicaid but think they are not insured because they don’t think Medicaid qualifies as insurance? How many of those 44MM include people that ARE eligible for Medicaid but elect not to participate? How many of those 44MM are under 35? Meaning that many of them may be healthy and could afford to purchase health insurance if they wanted to? I remember when I was younger I thought I was invincible? Pay a monthly health premium? Not a chance! I have a car payment and partying to do. Finally, how many of those 44MM include people that can afford to self insure? The point is, throwing out the 44MM sounds like a major crisis, when in actuality the people need health insurance and truly can’t afford it may be considerably lower. My point is, let’s not let some questionable statistics cloud our policy making. Let’s note that the first country to have “universal health care” was the Soviet Union. And before it’s fall they were one of the few countries that had both a declining life span and a rising infant mortality rate. Explain how everyone having health insurance helped?

  31. dude, dude, dude (I mean you, roboert),
    If you insist on bursting out in uproarious laughter every two minutes (for no apparent reason) AT LEAST turn your sound down. Jeez, I had the volume at a certain level to listen to the book author and then BOOM your laugh damn near fried my speakers. I’m being serious. Loved the interview, but the incredibly loud and frequent laugh volume, in comparison to the author’s volume level, really screwed up my ability to focus on the interview.

  32. dude, dude, dude (I mean you, roboert),
    If you insist on bursting out in uproarious laughter every two minutes (for no apparent reason) AT LEAST turn your sound down. Jeez, I had the volume at a certain level to listen to the book author and then BOOM your laugh damn near fried my speakers. I’m being serious. Loved the interview, but the incredibly loud and frequent laugh volume, in comparison to the author’s volume level, really screwed up my ability to focus on the interview.

  33. @19 Care to backup your assumptions with any actual research data? I’d love to see it.

    What that has to do with Tony’s point? When you justify the outsourcing by claiming that you are doing it to raise the people out of poverty elsewhere thats just BS. You are not doing because of that, thats just something you tell yourself and other to feel better. The only reason people do outsource is because of money, period…

  34. @19 Care to backup your assumptions with any actual research data? I’d love to see it.

    What that has to do with Tony’s point? When you justify the outsourcing by claiming that you are doing it to raise the people out of poverty elsewhere thats just BS. You are not doing because of that, thats just something you tell yourself and other to feel better. The only reason people do outsource is because of money, period…

  35. @21 “The only reason people do outsource is because of money, period…”

    You say that as if it were a bad thing. Whether people feel they are doing it because they think they are being alturistic doesn’t belie the fact that there are people in underdeveloped countries that are benefiting from it. So, how is that a bad thing. As for the possible loss of jobs in the US? Well, the country does have a way of adapting. How many telephone operators do you know today compared to the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s? How many farriers do you know today vs the 1800’s? Jobs get replaced and outsourced, but the country and the workforce adapts.

    “Care to backup your assumptions with any actual research data? I’d love to see it.”

    What assumptions? You’re the one that quoted the 44MM supposedly without health insurance. I’m not saying my questions are assumptions or facts. I’m simply asking you to better quantify your data.

  36. @21 “The only reason people do outsource is because of money, period…”

    You say that as if it were a bad thing. Whether people feel they are doing it because they think they are being alturistic doesn’t belie the fact that there are people in underdeveloped countries that are benefiting from it. So, how is that a bad thing. As for the possible loss of jobs in the US? Well, the country does have a way of adapting. How many telephone operators do you know today compared to the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s? How many farriers do you know today vs the 1800’s? Jobs get replaced and outsourced, but the country and the workforce adapts.

    “Care to backup your assumptions with any actual research data? I’d love to see it.”

    What assumptions? You’re the one that quoted the 44MM supposedly without health insurance. I’m not saying my questions are assumptions or facts. I’m simply asking you to better quantify your data.

  37. @22 I guess you have outsourced your reading… Try reading for a change… All numbers quoted are from official source with links provided, but hey if reading and understanding is beyond you, I guess that proves the point for outsourcing ;-)

    I didn’t say outsourcing for money is bad thing, but please don’t tell me BS about helping people in third world countries, like anyone who outsources actually cares about that… It is BS…

  38. @22 I guess you have outsourced your reading… Try reading for a change… All numbers quoted are from official source with links provided, but hey if reading and understanding is beyond you, I guess that proves the point for outsourcing ;-)

    I didn’t say outsourcing for money is bad thing, but please don’t tell me BS about helping people in third world countries, like anyone who outsources actually cares about that… It is BS…

  39. @23 Again, I’m not saying the 44MM number is inaccurate. I’m asking you to more finitely break down the numbers and define what “not having health insurance” means. Does it include people in between jobs that choose not to self insure? Does it include non-citizens? Does it include people under 35 that choose on their own accord not to pay for health insurance even though they could? The census only reports what people told them. All I’m saying is a drill down on the numbers might reveal a different picture. Simply saying “The US Census says there are 44MM without health insurance” while it makes for a great sound bite for the universal healthcare advocates, it may not be a completely accurate representation of the situation.

    ” didn’t say outsourcing for money is bad thing, but please don’t tell me BS about helping people in third world countries, like anyone who outsources actually cares about that… It is BS…”

    Whether they care or not is irrelvant. Do people in those countries benefit from outsourcing or don’t they? Yes or no? Altruistic motivation is irrelevant to the end result.

  40. @23 Again, I’m not saying the 44MM number is inaccurate. I’m asking you to more finitely break down the numbers and define what “not having health insurance” means. Does it include people in between jobs that choose not to self insure? Does it include non-citizens? Does it include people under 35 that choose on their own accord not to pay for health insurance even though they could? The census only reports what people told them. All I’m saying is a drill down on the numbers might reveal a different picture. Simply saying “The US Census says there are 44MM without health insurance” while it makes for a great sound bite for the universal healthcare advocates, it may not be a completely accurate representation of the situation.

    ” didn’t say outsourcing for money is bad thing, but please don’t tell me BS about helping people in third world countries, like anyone who outsources actually cares about that… It is BS…”

    Whether they care or not is irrelvant. Do people in those countries benefit from outsourcing or don’t they? Yes or no? Altruistic motivation is irrelevant to the end result.

  41. Tim Ferriss wouldn’t spend 50 minutes WATCHING Scobleshow – but I bet he might do like I did and treat it as radio. I heard it in 5 chunks over the course of a day, and enjoyed it very much.

    I’ve got a problem though, Robert. The audio-only feed for Scobleshow appears to be empty. That’s how I’d like to get your content, not choking up my iPod with video I don’t have time to watch.

    I’ll still click-through if I hear a demo I want to see, or for someone like Samantha Murphy! I first heard about Samantha when you blogged her at Podcast Hotel Seattle over a year ago, and I’ve been a fan of her music and her podcasting ever since. Thanks!

    Ditto the comments about the sound. Each speaker should have his/her own.

  42. Tim Ferriss wouldn’t spend 50 minutes WATCHING Scobleshow – but I bet he might do like I did and treat it as radio. I heard it in 5 chunks over the course of a day, and enjoyed it very much.

    I’ve got a problem though, Robert. The audio-only feed for Scobleshow appears to be empty. That’s how I’d like to get your content, not choking up my iPod with video I don’t have time to watch.

    I’ll still click-through if I hear a demo I want to see, or for someone like Samantha Murphy! I first heard about Samantha when you blogged her at Podcast Hotel Seattle over a year ago, and I’ve been a fan of her music and her podcasting ever since. Thanks!

    Ditto the comments about the sound. Each speaker should have his/her own.

  43. Why does pg 284 of Tim Ferriss’ book make use of a hoax email chain letter? Fraud or oversight?
    http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/medical/slowdance.asp

    Also, he says he’s a champion fighter. Independent searches have found no records of him registering as a fighter or fights that he has won.
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=54641

    People are so hungry for heroes these days they will believe anything. If this guy is a fraud, i hope you guys catch and expose him for what he is.

    owl

  44. Why does pg 284 of Tim Ferriss’ book make use of a hoax email chain letter? Fraud or oversight?
    http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/medical/slowdance.asp

    Also, he says he’s a champion fighter. Independent searches have found no records of him registering as a fighter or fights that he has won.
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=54641

    People are so hungry for heroes these days they will believe anything. If this guy is a fraud, i hope you guys catch and expose him for what he is.

    owl

  45. This owl dude appears to spend all his time posting negative comments about Ferriss across the Net. Get a life, dude or dudette,

  46. This owl dude appears to spend all his time posting negative comments about Ferriss across the Net. Get a life, dude or dudette,

  47. Robert, where on his blog? Can you please provide a link. I’m not seeing any kind of response from Tim on his blog or website.

    Frankly Robert, I’m disappointed. Whatever happened to the due dilligence you were known for in your Microsoft days? Instead of checking out the facts, you seem more interested in showbusiness these days with podtech than getting to the truth of things.

    owl

  48. Robert, where on his blog? Can you please provide a link. I’m not seeing any kind of response from Tim on his blog or website.

    Frankly Robert, I’m disappointed. Whatever happened to the due dilligence you were known for in your Microsoft days? Instead of checking out the facts, you seem more interested in showbusiness these days with podtech than getting to the truth of things.

    owl

  49. Owl,

    I appreciate the skepticism, as I realize that my bio seems unbelievable. I’m a skeptic myself and would probably respond the same way.

    I’ll address both of your points here, as I’ve only now come to realize how many places you’ve posted the same criticisms/comments. I would have replied sooner but have been on the road.

    I made the attribution of the poem on p. 284 based on the legitimacy of the source of the e-mail — a close friend and doctor. I only just became aware of its use in chain e-mail thanks to a heads up from one of my readers (thank you, Scott), and this will be immediately corrected in the next printing. No fraud involved. I have nothing to gain from making inaccurate attributions other than headache.

    For the fighting, please the multimedia section of my site. There is video footage — and has been since the site launched — of me winning the national sanshou (Chinese kickboxing) nationals at 165 lbs. in 1999 in Maryland. I also have a feature article with a photo of me fighting in the May 2007 issue of Fortune Small Business (FSB). I have a black belt in judo from the Kodokan in Tokyo, Japan, where I competed from 1992-1993. I have also trained at Brazilian Top Team (Rio) (photos on Flickr), Norwegian Top Team with Joachim “Hellboy” Hansen (Oslo), Takada Dojo (Tokyo), Kiguchi Dojo (Tokyo, where Takanori Gomi trains), Enson Inoue’s Purebred (Omiya, Japan), Yuki Nakai’s Paraestra (Tokyo), and Fairtex Muay Thai in Bangplee, Thailand (one of my Muay Thai knockouts — knee to the liver — is also on the fight video on my site), among others. I now train with some of best in the world of MMA and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at http://www.akakickbox.com. Drop in anytime to see me in action.

    I hope this clears things up. Robert, I sincerely apologize for the confusion caused by my delay in responding.

    Have a great weekend to all,

    Tim Ferriss
    P.S. Owl, I’d sincerely appreciate it if you could hold a ceasefire on the assault. I am not a fraud. I’m just a first-time author doing his best to spread ideas that might benefit a few people.

  50. Owl,

    I appreciate the skepticism, as I realize that my bio seems unbelievable. I’m a skeptic myself and would probably respond the same way.

    I’ll address both of your points here, as I’ve only now come to realize how many places you’ve posted the same criticisms/comments. I would have replied sooner but have been on the road.

    I made the attribution of the poem on p. 284 based on the legitimacy of the source of the e-mail — a close friend and doctor. I only just became aware of its use in chain e-mail thanks to a heads up from one of my readers (thank you, Scott), and this will be immediately corrected in the next printing. No fraud involved. I have nothing to gain from making inaccurate attributions other than headache.

    For the fighting, please the multimedia section of my site. There is video footage — and has been since the site launched — of me winning the national sanshou (Chinese kickboxing) nationals at 165 lbs. in 1999 in Maryland. I also have a feature article with a photo of me fighting in the May 2007 issue of Fortune Small Business (FSB). I have a black belt in judo from the Kodokan in Tokyo, Japan, where I competed from 1992-1993. I have also trained at Brazilian Top Team (Rio) (photos on Flickr), Norwegian Top Team with Joachim “Hellboy” Hansen (Oslo), Takada Dojo (Tokyo), Kiguchi Dojo (Tokyo, where Takanori Gomi trains), Enson Inoue’s Purebred (Omiya, Japan), Yuki Nakai’s Paraestra (Tokyo), and Fairtex Muay Thai in Bangplee, Thailand (one of my Muay Thai knockouts — knee to the liver — is also on the fight video on my site), among others. I now train with some of best in the world of MMA and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at http://www.akakickbox.com. Drop in anytime to see me in action.

    I hope this clears things up. Robert, I sincerely apologize for the confusion caused by my delay in responding.

    Have a great weekend to all,

    Tim Ferriss
    P.S. Owl, I’d sincerely appreciate it if you could hold a ceasefire on the assault. I am not a fraud. I’m just a first-time author doing his best to spread ideas that might benefit a few people.

  51. Owl: please go away. I hate people like you throwing the credibility attacks all over the place. YOU have no credibility. Certainly none to be putting me in my place.

  52. Owl: please go away. I hate people like you throwing the credibility attacks all over the place. YOU have no credibility. Certainly none to be putting me in my place.

  53. Tim, in your book you say that you got the poem from a terminally ill girl. Now you say it’s from a doctor friend. So, which is it?

    The fact you have only just realised this is from a hoax email raises further questions about your sources and the editorial policies of your publisher. Don’t they check stuff before printing?

    You also claim to have been a “Cage fighter in Japan, vanquisher of four world champions (MMA)”. Can you please name these four world champions so that we can run a check on the relevant databases?

    You also claim to be an “Advisor to more than 30 world record holders in professional and Olympic sports.” Can you please name five of these athletes so that we can verify your claims with them?

    Tim, I want to believe that someone like you exists for real. You seem like an interesting guy out to make a difference. Because you blocked all my comments on your blog regarding these issues instead of answering them, I’ve had to find other ways to verify the claims you make on your blog and in your book.

    You can put everyone’s mind at ease by properly substantiating the claims on your blog with independent proof/testimonials of your achievements. Photos and videos are not conclusive forms of proof, as shown by the Aleksey Vayner case.

    Everyone exaggerates, we understand that. But there is a fine line between exaggerating and lying, especially when it involves products being sold to people.

    owl

  54. Tim, in your book you say that you got the poem from a terminally ill girl. Now you say it’s from a doctor friend. So, which is it?

    The fact you have only just realised this is from a hoax email raises further questions about your sources and the editorial policies of your publisher. Don’t they check stuff before printing?

    You also claim to have been a “Cage fighter in Japan, vanquisher of four world champions (MMA)”. Can you please name these four world champions so that we can run a check on the relevant databases?

    You also claim to be an “Advisor to more than 30 world record holders in professional and Olympic sports.” Can you please name five of these athletes so that we can verify your claims with them?

    Tim, I want to believe that someone like you exists for real. You seem like an interesting guy out to make a difference. Because you blocked all my comments on your blog regarding these issues instead of answering them, I’ve had to find other ways to verify the claims you make on your blog and in your book.

    You can put everyone’s mind at ease by properly substantiating the claims on your blog with independent proof/testimonials of your achievements. Photos and videos are not conclusive forms of proof, as shown by the Aleksey Vayner case.

    Everyone exaggerates, we understand that. But there is a fine line between exaggerating and lying, especially when it involves products being sold to people.

    owl

  55. Hey Owl, don’t confuse the ideas with the author:

    “Intellectual achievements are the result of thought consecrated to the search for knowledge, or for the beautiful and true in life and nature. Such achievements may be sometimes connected with vanity and ambition, but they are not the outcome of those characteristics; they are the natural outgrowth of long and arduous effort, and of pure and unselfish thoughts.” J. Allen

  56. Hey Owl, don’t confuse the ideas with the author:

    “Intellectual achievements are the result of thought consecrated to the search for knowledge, or for the beautiful and true in life and nature. Such achievements may be sometimes connected with vanity and ambition, but they are not the outcome of those characteristics; they are the natural outgrowth of long and arduous effort, and of pure and unselfish thoughts.” J. Allen

  57. Dan, an author’s ideas need to have integrity, otherwise they ring hollow. Would you have bought James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces if you had known beforehand he had made up large parts of it?

    owl

  58. Dan, an author’s ideas need to have integrity, otherwise they ring hollow. Would you have bought James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces if you had known beforehand he had made up large parts of it?

    owl

  59. “I am a patient man — always willing to forgive on the Christian terms of repentance; and also to give ample time for repentance. Still I must save this government if possible.”
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
    ~ George Santayana

  60. “I am a patient man — always willing to forgive on the Christian terms of repentance; and also to give ample time for repentance. Still I must save this government if possible.”
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
    ~ George Santayana

  61. For outsourcing chat, email or back-office support

    If you are considering offshoring your processes, or would just like to know more about the various BPO / KPO services that can be outsourced to us in India, kindly contact

    us and our customer service representatives will get back to you soon.

    For outsourcing chat, email or back-office support, visit the website: http://www.outsourcebackoffice.com

  62. For outsourcing chat, email or back-office support

    If you are considering offshoring your processes, or would just like to know more about the various BPO / KPO services that can be outsourced to us in India, kindly contact

    us and our customer service representatives will get back to you soon.

    For outsourcing chat, email or back-office support, visit the website: http://www.outsourcebackoffice.com

  63. @29
    Frank: I agree. Owl is lame, Tim has refuted this guy’s claims over on his blog.

    Comment by Robert Scoble — June 14, 2007 @ 8:57 pm
    ===

    Robert, you owe me an apology. Still nothing on Ferriss’ blog. The truth will come out soon. owl

  64. @29
    Frank: I agree. Owl is lame, Tim has refuted this guy’s claims over on his blog.

    Comment by Robert Scoble — June 14, 2007 @ 8:57 pm
    ===

    Robert, you owe me an apology. Still nothing on Ferriss’ blog. The truth will come out soon. owl

  65. This is my last post on Ferriss. Look at the facts, search the Internet and decide for yourself.

    You are more powerful and influential than you realise. Exercise your democratic right to ask for the truth.

    Beware of mob mentality, groupthink and peer pressure. You are an individual. Look at the facts before making a decision, even if it may not be a popular decision.

    Information is power. The right info put into action can make you powerful and wealthy. Following the wrong info can harm you beyond repair.

    Question everything, assume nothing and have courage to voice out what you know to be true. Your next decision may just help avert a war or global catastrophe.

  66. This is my last post on Ferriss. Look at the facts, search the Internet and decide for yourself.

    You are more powerful and influential than you realise. Exercise your democratic right to ask for the truth.

    Beware of mob mentality, groupthink and peer pressure. You are an individual. Look at the facts before making a decision, even if it may not be a popular decision.

    Information is power. The right info put into action can make you powerful and wealthy. Following the wrong info can harm you beyond repair.

    Question everything, assume nothing and have courage to voice out what you know to be true. Your next decision may just help avert a war or global catastrophe.

  67. Ferriss has claimed to be an All-American wrestler at Princeton and a world champ in MMA. I do not believe either of these claims is true. Online databases of professional fights do not list him at all.

    The places he lists as having trained are for real, but that does not make him a world champion.

    He should come clean about that claim or lose all credibility.

    Mr. Scoble, I don’t understand why you don’t email him directly and ask him if he is a world champion in MMA or has ever had a professional fight. Training at a school or dojo is very far from being a professional athlete.

  68. Ferriss has claimed to be an All-American wrestler at Princeton and a world champ in MMA. I do not believe either of these claims is true. Online databases of professional fights do not list him at all.

    The places he lists as having trained are for real, but that does not make him a world champion.

    He should come clean about that claim or lose all credibility.

    Mr. Scoble, I don’t understand why you don’t email him directly and ask him if he is a world champion in MMA or has ever had a professional fight. Training at a school or dojo is very far from being a professional athlete.

  69. Since Mr. Scoble is one of the biggest fans of Tim Ferriss and Ferriss himself also pass by this lounge, I’ll post my question here. If Ferriss is so convinced that his methods are so applicable that everyone can cut down 20-30 hours working week and still have awesome income, then why does Ferriss block any comments on his blog that question any of the logical premises in his arguments. I posted an extremely civil comment on his blog, accepting all of his credentials to be true. My problem with the book is that Ferriss pretends to use economics to help him be what he is. However, anyone who has taken an elementary economics course would realize that all of the business suggestions Ferriss give are not applicable because they violate basic economic rules. I expanded on the topic much more in my comment but I will do so here only if I am sure that my comment won’t be censored. It seems like Ferriss is not interested at all in an intellectual discussion on how people can improve their lives but only in an army of zealous shallow supporters who will fall flat on their face when they realize how unatenable Ferriss’ suggestions are.
    Keep dream on people instead of realizing that you already live much better than what you deserve and produce. Someday your personal assisstant from India will take your place in the company and you’ll be dancing tango in argentina on social security.

  70. Since Mr. Scoble is one of the biggest fans of Tim Ferriss and Ferriss himself also pass by this lounge, I’ll post my question here. If Ferriss is so convinced that his methods are so applicable that everyone can cut down 20-30 hours working week and still have awesome income, then why does Ferriss block any comments on his blog that question any of the logical premises in his arguments. I posted an extremely civil comment on his blog, accepting all of his credentials to be true. My problem with the book is that Ferriss pretends to use economics to help him be what he is. However, anyone who has taken an elementary economics course would realize that all of the business suggestions Ferriss give are not applicable because they violate basic economic rules. I expanded on the topic much more in my comment but I will do so here only if I am sure that my comment won’t be censored. It seems like Ferriss is not interested at all in an intellectual discussion on how people can improve their lives but only in an army of zealous shallow supporters who will fall flat on their face when they realize how unatenable Ferriss’ suggestions are.
    Keep dream on people instead of realizing that you already live much better than what you deserve and produce. Someday your personal assisstant from India will take your place in the company and you’ll be dancing tango in argentina on social security.

  71. Just paused at minute 18 of your Tim Ferriss interview to tell you how much I’m enjoying it. My first book will be coming out in April 2008 so I was particularly interested in the discussion at the beginning about how he made the New York Times bestseller list before offline publicity kicked in. I had heard him say in other teleseminar interviews that he credits bloggers with this success. My book includes a chapter on publicity which I’m tempted to chuck and replace with a 5 word chapter “Go hang out with bloggers!”.
    Read some of the controversy on your blog about Tim’s past. My take on this? Tim obviously has tons to teach us regardless of whether he’s the world tango champ or not.
    Rock on!
    Tsufit
    http://www.secretsfromthespotlight.com

  72. Just paused at minute 18 of your Tim Ferriss interview to tell you how much I’m enjoying it. My first book will be coming out in April 2008 so I was particularly interested in the discussion at the beginning about how he made the New York Times bestseller list before offline publicity kicked in. I had heard him say in other teleseminar interviews that he credits bloggers with this success. My book includes a chapter on publicity which I’m tempted to chuck and replace with a 5 word chapter “Go hang out with bloggers!”.
    Read some of the controversy on your blog about Tim’s past. My take on this? Tim obviously has tons to teach us regardless of whether he’s the world tango champ or not.
    Rock on!
    Tsufit
    http://www.secretsfromthespotlight.com

  73. I’m not sure what I find more disturbing: the fact that Ferriss refuses to properly respond to these allegations or the fact that so many people believe in him without feeling the need to question his claims.

    How can Ferriss be a “National Chinese Kickboxing Champion”? You would have to be a Chinese citizen to claim that. And using a hoax email poem to score emotional points is just distasteful to say the least.

    Too many holes in Ferriss’ story. I have to call bullshit on this one.

    Tom

  74. I’m not sure what I find more disturbing: the fact that Ferriss refuses to properly respond to these allegations or the fact that so many people believe in him without feeling the need to question his claims.

    How can Ferriss be a “National Chinese Kickboxing Champion”? You would have to be a Chinese citizen to claim that. And using a hoax email poem to score emotional points is just distasteful to say the least.

    Too many holes in Ferriss’ story. I have to call bullshit on this one.

    Tom

  75. “It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence.”
    – William Kingdon Clifford, 19th Century British mathematician and philosopher

  76. “It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence.”
    – William Kingdon Clifford, 19th Century British mathematician and philosopher

  77. I read Ferriss’ book recently. He has no concept of ethics and seems to cheat his way through life. Most of his claims are questionable. The fact that his book is selling so well in the US says a lot about the majority of Americans – naive, gullible sheep ready for the slaughter. It’s not terrorists we should be worried about, it’s “wolves in sheep’s clothing” like Ferriss who seemingly have a free license to spread false values and unethical behavior.

    Sheep with Eyes Open

  78. I read Ferriss’ book recently. He has no concept of ethics and seems to cheat his way through life. Most of his claims are questionable. The fact that his book is selling so well in the US says a lot about the majority of Americans – naive, gullible sheep ready for the slaughter. It’s not terrorists we should be worried about, it’s “wolves in sheep’s clothing” like Ferriss who seemingly have a free license to spread false values and unethical behavior.

    Sheep with Eyes Open