“Flashless Adobe Apollo” ships AIR: Adobe IPhone Runtime?

There’s a ton of news out tonight about Adobe’s new Apollo, beta ships tomorrow. This developer toolset lets Web developers build apps that work like desktop apps. It has a new name, too: Adobe Integrated Runtime, or “AIR.”

But, don’t miss the fact that Apollo apps no longer require Flash. They can be built totally in Ajax/JavaScript/HTML.

Now, why would Adobe want to do that? Well, they are positioning Apollo as the best way to build offline Web apps.

But I am putting another theory out there. If Steve Jobs isn’t putting third-party runtimes into the iPhone (as has been widely reported), how else will Adobe help its designers/developers get apps onto the iPhone?

Hmmmm.

PS: I’m not saying this theory is correct, but this is one of the first things I’m going to try when I get my hands on the iPhone. If it comes true that Flashless Apollo apps will run on the iPhone, then watch for this to be a cool way for developers to get offline apps onto the iPhone.

Hey, AIR could also stand for “Adobe IPhone Runtime.” :-)

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Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. The Adobe Integrated Runtime is a way to transform normal in-browser apps to full desktop apps, with file-writing privileges, full windowing controls, PDF support, and more.

    I have no idea what Steve Jobs will announce for iPhone, but running Player on a device will be a prerequisite for running AIR on that device.

    (Naming notes: “Apollo” couldn’t pass trademark restrictions… “AIR” happens to be “RIA” backwards, but I don’t know if it was intentionally chosen for that reason… the proper name is “Adobe AIR” (with trademarks), and even though that de-acronymizes into “Adobe Adobe Integrated Runtime”, “Adobe AIR” still has a certain ring… I haven’t seen anyone call people “AIRheads” yet, but give it time…. ;-)

    jd/adobe

  2. The Adobe Integrated Runtime is a way to transform normal in-browser apps to full desktop apps, with file-writing privileges, full windowing controls, PDF support, and more.

    I have no idea what Steve Jobs will announce for iPhone, but running Player on a device will be a prerequisite for running AIR on that device.

    (Naming notes: “Apollo” couldn’t pass trademark restrictions… “AIR” happens to be “RIA” backwards, but I don’t know if it was intentionally chosen for that reason… the proper name is “Adobe AIR” (with trademarks), and even though that de-acronymizes into “Adobe Adobe Integrated Runtime”, “Adobe AIR” still has a certain ring… I haven’t seen anyone call people “AIRheads” yet, but give it time…. ;-)

    jd/adobe

  3. being in cabo makes you way to lighthearted uh Tocayo? (i am also born names Robert).

    Anyway, it is evident, that if Apollo could not stick, this was the perfect opportunity to reboot the perception of Adobe new runtime and also respond to Both Silverlight and javaFx with something that could broaden even more the path to success.

    i guess this will assure they do such a thing. i really belive that the next generation everything will be either silverlight or adobe AIR leaving javaFX lagging in a distant third place on web and destop development, they still have a good chance of winning first place in the mobile apps race against MS but even that is now uncertain.

  4. being in cabo makes you way to lighthearted uh Tocayo? (i am also born names Robert).

    Anyway, it is evident, that if Apollo could not stick, this was the perfect opportunity to reboot the perception of Adobe new runtime and also respond to Both Silverlight and javaFx with something that could broaden even more the path to success.

    i guess this will assure they do such a thing. i really belive that the next generation everything will be either silverlight or adobe AIR leaving javaFX lagging in a distant third place on web and destop development, they still have a good chance of winning first place in the mobile apps race against MS but even that is now uncertain.

  5. but will the phone companies allow any 3rd party content – in the uk they have crippled the voip on one of the latest nokia phones

    I doubt if the us is going to be any diferent

  6. but will the phone companies allow any 3rd party content – in the uk they have crippled the voip on one of the latest nokia phones

    I doubt if the us is going to be any diferent

  7. While the product is great, the “beta” installer has a little problem, since it calls AttachConsole, that is not supperted in Windows 2000 (my OS).
    So, or the installer is broken, or WinXP/Vista is an untold requirement.

  8. While the product is great, the “beta” installer has a little problem, since it calls AttachConsole, that is not supperted in Windows 2000 (my OS).
    So, or the installer is broken, or WinXP/Vista is an untold requirement.

  9. “They can be built totally in Ajax/JavaScript/HTML” is true ONLY if the AIR runtime is already installed on the client. Ergo, if Apple isn’t allowing third-party runtimes on the iPhone then AIR apps are still out of luck. IMHO, the non-Flash announcement is meant to broaden AIR’s appeal to developers.

  10. “They can be built totally in Ajax/JavaScript/HTML” is true ONLY if the AIR runtime is already installed on the client. Ergo, if Apple isn’t allowing third-party runtimes on the iPhone then AIR apps are still out of luck. IMHO, the non-Flash announcement is meant to broaden AIR’s appeal to developers.

  11. I think it’s great that they are dropping the flash requirement. A lot of work computers do not have flash installed for security purposes.

  12. I think it’s great that they are dropping the flash requirement. A lot of work computers do not have flash installed for security purposes.

  13. Just to be clear, whether an AIR app uses Flash or not, you don’t need the Flash plugin to run it. AIR apps run in the AIR runtime and don’t require any secondary playback components.

  14. Just to be clear, whether an AIR app uses Flash or not, you don’t need the Flash plugin to run it. AIR apps run in the AIR runtime and don’t require any secondary playback components.

  15. Surely in saying this Robert, you are suggesting that the iPhone is about to take over the world? No 3G, 2MP camera…surely not worth creating a whole new software language for!

  16. Surely in saying this Robert, you are suggesting that the iPhone is about to take over the world? No 3G, 2MP camera…surely not worth creating a whole new software language for!

  17. Paul: I predict they sell all 3 million within the first day. I’ve been talking to quite a few “normal people” here in Cabo and a very high percentage wants the iPhone. It +is+ the story of the summer in the tech industry, Google’s privacy notwithstanding.

  18. Paul: I predict they sell all 3 million within the first day. I’ve been talking to quite a few “normal people” here in Cabo and a very high percentage wants the iPhone. It +is+ the story of the summer in the tech industry, Google’s privacy notwithstanding.

  19. Danny: I could see a scenario where Steve Jobs would allow this runtime because it doesn’t break the UI, doesn’t take a huge number of resources, doesn’t change the programming model too much from the Web and doesn’t allow non-Web code to be run that could cause security and other problems that would cause people to have a bad experience on the iPhone. (Kyte.tv’s Java app, for instance, drained my battery within a few hours).

  20. Danny: I could see a scenario where Steve Jobs would allow this runtime because it doesn’t break the UI, doesn’t take a huge number of resources, doesn’t change the programming model too much from the Web and doesn’t allow non-Web code to be run that could cause security and other problems that would cause people to have a bad experience on the iPhone. (Kyte.tv’s Java app, for instance, drained my battery within a few hours).