Why I read feeds, thanks Paul Thurrott

Today’s post by Paul Thurrott is why I read feeds. It’s not important to a mass audience. It won’t get on TechMeme or Digg or TailRank or Google News. But I have met Paul and didn’t realize his son is deaf and getting cochlear implants. His story is moving and shares with us that the technology is progressing to the point where his son will have a mostly-normal life. It’s inspiring, thanks to Paul for sharing it. And next time I’m at some boring conference and looking for something to say to Paul I’ll be sure to ask him how his son is doing. God forbid, if my own son has the same set of problems I know the first person I’ll call.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. I cannot half-imagine how Paul must have felt.

    I’ve listened to his podcast with Leo several times. It’s strange how we forget, or simply don’t realize, the humanity of content creators. So often we’re focused with just the content, the technology-in-itself under review; editorially, maybe that’s not a bad thing. But suffice it to say that I now have a respect for Paul that no Windows review could produce.

  2. I cannot half-imagine how Paul must have felt.

    I’ve listened to his podcast with Leo several times. It’s strange how we forget, or simply don’t realize, the humanity of content creators. So often we’re focused with just the content, the technology-in-itself under review; editorially, maybe that’s not a bad thing. But suffice it to say that I now have a respect for Paul that no Windows review could produce.

  3. I’ve had the priveledge of meeting Professor Graeme Clark, the creator of the cochlear implant (his daughter used to go to the same church as I do) and he is an inspring man. His drive to solve the technological and engineering problems surrounding the development of this modern miracle of science is inspriational.

    One of my favourite recollections is how he solved the problem af attaching one of the older model implants. part of the device had to be attached to the wearer’s skull. His team of doctors tried to design an attachment that screwed into the skull. Eventually he talked to an engineer who suggested implanting a small magnet under the skin.

    Goes to show that solutions to complex problems need not be complex themselves.

    My prayers to Paul and his family.

  4. I’ve had the priveledge of meeting Professor Graeme Clark, the creator of the cochlear implant (his daughter used to go to the same church as I do) and he is an inspring man. His drive to solve the technological and engineering problems surrounding the development of this modern miracle of science is inspriational.

    One of my favourite recollections is how he solved the problem af attaching one of the older model implants. part of the device had to be attached to the wearer’s skull. His team of doctors tried to design an attachment that screwed into the skull. Eventually he talked to an engineer who suggested implanting a small magnet under the skin.

    Goes to show that solutions to complex problems need not be complex themselves.

    My prayers to Paul and his family.

  5. With mixed feelings I read that post by Paul, having never fully realised as Bill Dalsen commented previously “the humanity of content creators.”

    My best wishes go out to Paul & his son, hoping that he’ll be on the road to recovery.

    My father lived nearby to Professor Clark when he was a kid, and I believe that he would have met him at one point in time. It was also interesting to read of Anthony Caruana meeting him, wow it seems like such a small world.

  6. With mixed feelings I read that post by Paul, having never fully realised as Bill Dalsen commented previously “the humanity of content creators.”

    My best wishes go out to Paul & his son, hoping that he’ll be on the road to recovery.

    My father lived nearby to Professor Clark when he was a kid, and I believe that he would have met him at one point in time. It was also interesting to read of Anthony Caruana meeting him, wow it seems like such a small world.

  7. Wonderfully thoughtful post. I have added lots of new blogs to my regular reading, yours included, and what I enjoy best is no longer getting the latest tech news but the feel that some posts give me of sitting on a conversation.

    Your posts have taken on a more relaxed and friendly tone over the last year, more mature in some aspects. That’s a bigger draw for me than finding out you scooped the Plaxo thing. That said, I enjoy a good review that’s not just the hype. (why a lot of blogs seem redudant)

    Thanks Robert and btw, I’ve been enjoying your presence on Facebook. You’re a hoot.

  8. Wonderfully thoughtful post. I have added lots of new blogs to my regular reading, yours included, and what I enjoy best is no longer getting the latest tech news but the feel that some posts give me of sitting on a conversation.

    Your posts have taken on a more relaxed and friendly tone over the last year, more mature in some aspects. That’s a bigger draw for me than finding out you scooped the Plaxo thing. That said, I enjoy a good review that’s not just the hype. (why a lot of blogs seem redudant)

    Thanks Robert and btw, I’ve been enjoying your presence on Facebook. You’re a hoot.

  9. Paul’s story about his son is remarkable. I especially like the part where his wife gives the insurance company a smack upside the head.

    His love for his son comes through loud and clear.

  10. Paul’s story about his son is remarkable. I especially like the part where his wife gives the insurance company a smack upside the head.

    His love for his son comes through loud and clear.