NewTeeVee Conference lacking substance?

The folks over at NewTeeVee just announced its new conference schedule for a conference about NewTeeVee.

I find it severely lacking.

First, why feature Joost? They haven’t proven that they’ll survive in this new TV marketplace. I’m willing to bet that Justin.tv or Kyte.tv will have 10x the traffic in a year than Joost. Even TechCrunch is growing bearish on Joost’s future. Why is Joost going to have trouble? Because they wanted to replace TV and the TV networks will NEVER give Joost their best stuff.

But let’s face it, it’s still a YouTube world online. What will change that?

So, what else is missing at a discussion of new TV stuff?

1. Best practices of old on new. The best example of oldTV coming to newTV is what ABC.com is doing. Ever watch Lost over there? I have and it’s the best stuff out there. They are using technology from Move Networks. That stuff blows away Joost. To me THAT is “new TV.”
2. The best advertising technology I’ve seen is CastFire. I don’t see them on the program. I do see Brightroll. That’s good, I have a 24-minute interview with the founder on my show. Nexidia showed me a bleeding edge technology that’s already bringing new kinds of contextual ads to several TV stations’ local news shows.
3. The biggest innovator in streaming media is Chris Pirillo. The way he uses chat. His sponsorships. And the way he uses YouTube is very innovative yet he isn’t on the program.
4. Codec comparisons: DivX has some of the best codecs out there. It also has a set top box that I’m playing with and its Stage6 community is pretty neat. DivX’s CEO was on my show at CES earlier this year. Adobe is doing a bunch of work. So are other folks. Can we see a shootout? Or techniques to get the sharpest picture online?
5. Apple? No, they have nothing to do with “new TV” right? Well, I haven’t been able to get them on my show either, but Rocky uses Apple’s FinalCutPro to edit my show.
6. Adobe? I see one guy on there as part of a panel discussion. Are we going to learn anything in a panel?: No, we won’t. But the folks who bring us Flash deserve a lot more than a panel slot. Not to mention they have a video editor, Premiere. Oh, and my video with the engineering team behind Flex/Flash talking about its architecture got hundreds of thousands of views.
7. Microsoft? They want to get market share away from Adobe. I see Dan’l Lewin there, but you do realize he isn’t a technical guy and he hasn’t built any video or done any video on the Net, right? He was a co-founder of NeXT, though. Maybe that’s the closest to Steve Jobs you could get.
8. Rocketboom? They just shipped an iPhone app. They have the best distribution system I’ve seen for an independent video blog. Andrew is still doing innovative stuff. Where’s he?
9. Blognation? (Or ANY blog network other than GigaOm?) They are about to put video bloggers in dozens of countries. But not gonna be at NewTeeVee I guess. And because they are a competitive thing to GigaOm they get locked out the same way that PodTech gets locked out. If I ran a conference I’d invite my competitors to speak. Why? Cause my first responsibility as a conference planner is to the people who come. See Eric Norlin’s video for more on planning a great conference.
10. USVP? They invested in several video ventures (including PodTech, Zannel, and National Banana). Not gonna be there and they should be. Heck, let’s get out of stuff that’d help me out. Last night I had dinner with Stewart Alsop. He’s an investor in Justin.tv. Why isn’t he on the VC panel? Justin is doing the most innovative stuff in the streaming video space.
11. Tracking and uploading? TubeMogul, for instance, showed me how they can let video bloggers upload to multiple sites and track their results. Compete.com’s CTO was on my show too. I wish someone would do a session on new ways to demonstrate audience engagement and size and all that.
12. New ways to tell video stories? YourTrumanShow showed me how, for instance.
13. Mixing 3D world’s with video? I don’t see that either. But Scenecaster has a way to do that. So does Second Life. More on the way. I’d love to hear the latest and see what Eric Rice and friends are up to.
14. Why not a session on video vs. audio? There’s a lot of interest there and it sure would be interesting to see if BlogTalkRadio could make a case for audio. You noticed my son’s first sounds on the Internet were audio only, not a video, even though I had lots of video gear there. Heck, I sure could learn something about getting better audio quality.
15. Facebook? MySpace? LinkedIn? Plaxo? Facebook is one of the hottest video sites on the Internet yet I see nothing about it. That’s really lame and missing where a TON of “new TV” action is happening.
16. Building a social network around your video site? Magnify, Ning, and Broadband Mechanics might have something to say about that. In fact, Magnify shows off a great “new TV” site to me. Ning showed me their stuff too. So does BlogTronix, which has a system that lets companies build sites very similar to the Channel 9 one at Microsoft. Ning will be at the conference but, again, only on a panel. That’s not the help that people need — they need demos of what’s possible, not more talk.
17. Legal issues with new TV. How do you get rights to music, other people’s videos? What’s the rules around fair use?
18. Mobile video? On my show Buzzwire showed off its solution. Also, Radar.net showed me a way to share videos with your friends from your mobile phones. Kyte.tv’s CEO is on a panel discussion but I doubt they’ll do a demonstration of how that works. It really is mind-blowing what you can do on a cell phone now.
19. Streaming video? Ustream came on my show to demonstrate what it’s doing. Veodia is aimed at big companies with a better quality streaming video.
20. Mashups? YouTube is now showing videos on top of Google Earth. Plazes is giving us location-based presence. What could we do with that?
21. Film sites. Jaman is very impressive, for instance.
22. Webcasting? IVT showed me its solution. So did Adobe with its Connect service.
23. New kinds of Web experiences that’ll have an impact on how video is used. Zude got my “demo of the year” mark and demonstrates new ways to use video online. Mixercast is a cool way to mashup video, pictures, and other stuff too.
24. New hardware gadgets for video producers? Drobo showed me a new hard drive system, for instance, that we’re using at PodTech and love. I’ve been testing out tons of the latest gear including a Nokia N95 with Kyte.tv and a new Nikon pocket camera that has wifi built in. Heck, get Ryan Block of Engadget to come out and show off the latest gear. That dude has a ton of gadgets in his house and he always knows what’s good and what’s not.
25. Real Networks? Do they have a shot at sticking around? They came on my show to demonstrate its new player which lets you save from YouTube.
26. Search and Discovery. MeeVee demoed its search engine. Blinkx CEO came on my show to talk about it (then later took his company to an IPO). Dabble’s founder/CEO showed me its cool search portal and community for video. Stumbleupon came on my show to demonstrate its cool video discovery service.
27. Why don’t I see anything on Windows Media Center? TV Tonic showed me a killer system that’s getting lots of traffic for video bloggers.
28. Video greeting cards? Smilebox showed me theirs.
29. Video email? EyeJot showed me how to do it.
30. Bleeding edge ways to use video cameras? Get Andy Wilson from Microsoft Research to come down. He showed me a system that was wild.
31. Ways to make money with your “new TV?” Edgeio showed me a classified ad system that a few video bloggers are using to bring in some extra cash.
32. Splashcast has been seeing massive growth through its Facebook application. They came on my show a few months ago to demonstrate its widget and media distribution network.
33. What’s the future of home entertainment systems? Seagate showed me its version at CES. I just interviewed MediaMaster too (mostly music right now, but video someday soon) and they have a very awesome service. Videos of that coming soon.
34. Screencasting for fun and profit. Don McAllister, who publishes screencastsonline.com, came on my show to talk about how he does it.
35. Google? They do this thing called YouTube. You might have heard of it. Marc Lucovsky showed me how to “bling my blog” with a video bar, too.
36. Video education? Winnov showed me an innovative system for universities to use.
37. Loic Le Meur’s Seesmic (here’s me talking about it). If you really want to be known as “NewTeeVee” you gotta have them on the schedule.
38. Zannel. I interviewed them this week and they are competing with Seesmic and Kyte.tv.
39. UPDATE: I totally forgot Bittorrent. A guy I know downloads all of his TV shows via Bittorrent (and movies and music too). I’m sure he’s not alone so a conference like this should discuss that and what the industry should do for or against it.
40. Serving an international audience. Look at the new Pop!Tech videos. They have subtitles with eight languages in them. That really rocks. But what do you need to do if you want to serve China and keep your videos from getting censored? How about transcriptions so that search engines can work better? Etc.

$500 for this? Damn, maybe I should start charging for my show! I give you a TON more content for free! :-)

Heck, we can even meet over on my newfangled Kyte.tv channel and have a live chat. With audio, video, AND good old text, even!

Oh, and keep in mind I +HATE+ panel discussions. They look great on the Web site, or in a brochure (that’s why I added them to my conferences when I planned them). But you rarely learn anything you can take away and apply to your keyboard. I was just on a panel discussion too at the recent Facebook conference and, while it was entertaining (a good fight on a panel is one way they can be redeeming) I watched the video and didn’t see anything anyone would have learned from it.

UPDATE: Om and I had a nice talk this morning and he’s severely constrained by time (this is a one-day conference). More on that conversation hopefully later in next week.

If you were doing a conference on “new TV” what would you put on it?

Comments

  1. OMG.

    #1) I’m glad I’m not them.

    #2) I like Fox’s video player much more than I like ABC’s. I don’t like that Fox keeps canceling shows after 1 episode and they don’t make the remaining episodes available online.

    #3) You just wrote, like, an encyclopedia of online TV stuff. You’re such a wonderful resource.

  2. OMG.

    #1) I’m glad I’m not them.

    #2) I like Fox’s video player much more than I like ABC’s. I don’t like that Fox keeps canceling shows after 1 episode and they don’t make the remaining episodes available online.

    #3) You just wrote, like, an encyclopedia of online TV stuff. You’re such a wonderful resource.

  3. Interesting. But…you just made their conference better by giving them 38 things to rant about.

    I used to think nobody would sit in a laggy game world and watch TV, they’d tab out of their game and watch YouTube or they’d swivel around and watch their TV when something was loading on their Internet, but not watch a tiny screen within a screen.

    But…that was until I had gadzillion customers in SL ask me to deed their TVs and insist on TV in their rentals, and I realized I had to adapt. They actually LOVE watching tv and movies (but not machinima except for intellectuals). Because they can watch with their buddies from around the world, it’s Mystery Theater. Because they can make an event out of it and discuss it. Or just use the porn for foreplay, after all, as good as they are, SL avatar animations for cybering probably aren’t as good as video porn. Whatever, they watch TV, before, during, after, despite the laggyness, visual problems, the fact that each person on the parcel has to tune in and watch separately out of sync (but close enough to still all perceive it).

    Panels are awful, you’re right, because nobody gets to talk enough in the audience — or the panel. If a speaker is really good, you want a 30-45 minute keynoter or lecture out of them anyway. Having 4 people all answer the same question from the moderator is deadly. I was just at VW07 where they had Susan Wu peppering all the pet game execs with questions, and while it was a change from other panels where the moderator was a potted palm, it only makes the audience champ at the bit.

    Look, with all this emerging technology whatnot, we need to change these memes of panels, left over from 1950s television shows like “What’s My Line?” (“Blindfolds in place, panel?).

    We need to have circles of people able to talk all at once or something. Live-action Twittering.

  4. Interesting. But…you just made their conference better by giving them 38 things to rant about.

    I used to think nobody would sit in a laggy game world and watch TV, they’d tab out of their game and watch YouTube or they’d swivel around and watch their TV when something was loading on their Internet, but not watch a tiny screen within a screen.

    But…that was until I had gadzillion customers in SL ask me to deed their TVs and insist on TV in their rentals, and I realized I had to adapt. They actually LOVE watching tv and movies (but not machinima except for intellectuals). Because they can watch with their buddies from around the world, it’s Mystery Theater. Because they can make an event out of it and discuss it. Or just use the porn for foreplay, after all, as good as they are, SL avatar animations for cybering probably aren’t as good as video porn. Whatever, they watch TV, before, during, after, despite the laggyness, visual problems, the fact that each person on the parcel has to tune in and watch separately out of sync (but close enough to still all perceive it).

    Panels are awful, you’re right, because nobody gets to talk enough in the audience — or the panel. If a speaker is really good, you want a 30-45 minute keynoter or lecture out of them anyway. Having 4 people all answer the same question from the moderator is deadly. I was just at VW07 where they had Susan Wu peppering all the pet game execs with questions, and while it was a change from other panels where the moderator was a potted palm, it only makes the audience champ at the bit.

    Look, with all this emerging technology whatnot, we need to change these memes of panels, left over from 1950s television shows like “What’s My Line?” (“Blindfolds in place, panel?).

    We need to have circles of people able to talk all at once or something. Live-action Twittering.

  5. To me, the most exciting thing about online video is how anyone with a good idea can find an audience and be successful *without* the old gatekeepers. It’s a magnificent disruption.

    What does the NewTeeVee conference seemed focus on? The old gatekeepers.

    No thanks.

  6. To me, the most exciting thing about online video is how anyone with a good idea can find an audience and be successful *without* the old gatekeepers. It’s a magnificent disruption.

    What does the NewTeeVee conference seemed focus on? The old gatekeepers.

    No thanks.

  7. So Robert – when are YOU going to plan the AMAZING COOL event you just described? People would come! And since you are Scoble, you could probably GET those companies and individuals you just mentioned to show up, as well.

    Just sayin!

  8. So Robert – when are YOU going to plan the AMAZING COOL event you just described? People would come! And since you are Scoble, you could probably GET those companies and individuals you just mentioned to show up, as well.

    Just sayin!

  9. Chuck: my favorite thing about new TV is that it’s two-way. See Kyte.tv. Did you know you can post video to my channel there?

    David: thanks for the compliment, but I don’t want to do a conference right now. Heck, doing my show is a lot more fun right now.

  10. Chuck: my favorite thing about new TV is that it’s two-way. See Kyte.tv. Did you know you can post video to my channel there?

    David: thanks for the compliment, but I don’t want to do a conference right now. Heck, doing my show is a lot more fun right now.

  11. Scoble, in reading your blog it seems whenever someone criticizes your work you come back with the defensive “what have you done….?”. Well,since you seem to be criticizing the organizers of this conference one might ask, what media related conferences have you done to make you such an expert?

  12. Scoble, in reading your blog it seems whenever someone criticizes your work you come back with the defensive “what have you done….?”. Well,since you seem to be criticizing the organizers of this conference one might ask, what media related conferences have you done to make you such an expert?

  13. Joel: I helped produce the CNET Builder.com Live conference in 1999 and 2000 (that’s the conference that got me into blogging). Also helped plan several VBITS and Visual Studio conferences (2,000 attendee affairs about Visual Basic). If you had listened to the interview with Eric Norlin, who hosts several large conferences, you would have heard us talking about that experience and how it shaped my video show today.

  14. Joel: I helped produce the CNET Builder.com Live conference in 1999 and 2000 (that’s the conference that got me into blogging). Also helped plan several VBITS and Visual Studio conferences (2,000 attendee affairs about Visual Basic). If you had listened to the interview with Eric Norlin, who hosts several large conferences, you would have heard us talking about that experience and how it shaped my video show today.

  15. Hi Robert,

    With a one-day conference we can’t fit everything in, but we’re doing our best to involve a wide range of companies and people who have interesting things to say and show off (including quite a few of the people on your list, actually!). You should come check it out and see what you think.

    Liz Gannes
    Editor, NewTeeVee

  16. Hi Robert,

    With a one-day conference we can’t fit everything in, but we’re doing our best to involve a wide range of companies and people who have interesting things to say and show off (including quite a few of the people on your list, actually!). You should come check it out and see what you think.

    Liz Gannes
    Editor, NewTeeVee

  17. Robert,

    Thanks for the mention. We just attended the Jarvis Network Journalism conference in NYC and live streamed interviews all day.

    It’s not video, but the conversation is what counts and live interactive archival audio gets us there.

    Alan Levy
    Founder
    BlogTalkRadio

  18. Robert,

    Thanks for the mention. We just attended the Jarvis Network Journalism conference in NYC and live streamed interviews all day.

    It’s not video, but the conversation is what counts and live interactive archival audio gets us there.

    Alan Levy
    Founder
    BlogTalkRadio

  19. Liz: I’ll be at the conference. That’s actually the reason why I wrote this post. I want to make sure it’s worth my time investment.

    Om and I had a nice chat this morning. Hope to have some more to say on that soon. Keep it up, keep the faith!

  20. Liz: I’ll be at the conference. That’s actually the reason why I wrote this post. I want to make sure it’s worth my time investment.

    Om and I had a nice chat this morning. Hope to have some more to say on that soon. Keep it up, keep the faith!

  21. Great list, Robert. Double edge sword, there: You’ve just made Om’s conference a lot more interesting and a lot less necessary. And, yes, panels are pain points. Trying hard to remember a good one. Glad for your Tweet updating the chat you and Om had.

    BTW you’re undercounting Apple’s new teevee contributions. There’s lots more than Final Cut: For simple user-participaton check this out: a couple of teenagers in the UK stroll into the Apple Store, take on two adjacent MacBooks and discover they can simultaneously recording to each other’s YouTube channels–an instant two-camera shoot for free.: http://urltea.com/1qt0 and http://urltea.com/1qt1 .

    How? iMovie lets you capture video directly from a built-in iSight Camera and provides a direct upload to YouTube.Can’t get easier than that.

    At the high end end, there’s a ton of free video podcasts through iTunes to iPods and iPhone.(and Apple TV)

    As for commercial distribution–well… that’s a work in progress and a major competitive battle–but iTunes is definitely in the game.

  22. Great list, Robert. Double edge sword, there: You’ve just made Om’s conference a lot more interesting and a lot less necessary. And, yes, panels are pain points. Trying hard to remember a good one. Glad for your Tweet updating the chat you and Om had.

    BTW you’re undercounting Apple’s new teevee contributions. There’s lots more than Final Cut: For simple user-participaton check this out: a couple of teenagers in the UK stroll into the Apple Store, take on two adjacent MacBooks and discover they can simultaneously recording to each other’s YouTube channels–an instant two-camera shoot for free.: http://urltea.com/1qt0 and http://urltea.com/1qt1 .

    How? iMovie lets you capture video directly from a built-in iSight Camera and provides a direct upload to YouTube.Can’t get easier than that.

    At the high end end, there’s a ton of free video podcasts through iTunes to iPods and iPhone.(and Apple TV)

    As for commercial distribution–well… that’s a work in progress and a major competitive battle–but iTunes is definitely in the game.

  23. Two things I’d at least try to explore regarding TV:

    – Cross-country boundaries. There are a lot more people tuned to specific culture niches, and how to best get at those niches (territories, the current model for distribution rights, etc.). And no, don’t take for granted that the Internet will go everywhere.

    – Mobile. Not necessarily mobile TV, but ways to extend the viewing experience to leverage the (purported) bazillions of people out there with mobile phones. And the experience is a lot more than viewing – it’s participating, commenting, etc.

  24. Two things I’d at least try to explore regarding TV:

    – Cross-country boundaries. There are a lot more people tuned to specific culture niches, and how to best get at those niches (territories, the current model for distribution rights, etc.). And no, don’t take for granted that the Internet will go everywhere.

    – Mobile. Not necessarily mobile TV, but ways to extend the viewing experience to leverage the (purported) bazillions of people out there with mobile phones. And the experience is a lot more than viewing – it’s participating, commenting, etc.

  25. I am right in the middle of producing a conference and realizing how fast the time fills up and how panels don’t let anyone speak enough to be meaningful. The alternative is Gnomedex, and the single track in which you can’t cover a large topic.

    I have a great idea: next year you and I put on the conference you think should happen. I will help. I think it’s time you did one rather than just commented on one, and you see so much stuff that it’s bound to be good. I will provide the adult supervision :-)

  26. I am right in the middle of producing a conference and realizing how fast the time fills up and how panels don’t let anyone speak enough to be meaningful. The alternative is Gnomedex, and the single track in which you can’t cover a large topic.

    I have a great idea: next year you and I put on the conference you think should happen. I will help. I think it’s time you did one rather than just commented on one, and you see so much stuff that it’s bound to be good. I will provide the adult supervision :-)

  27. Robert great list one big category to add the content delivery networks which are helping power many sites with much more to come. Also hd radio and hdtv plus perhaps the blurring of tv vs games with devices like xbox360 etc

  28. Robert great list one big category to add the content delivery networks which are helping power many sites with much more to come. Also hd radio and hdtv plus perhaps the blurring of tv vs games with devices like xbox360 etc

  29. Robert:

    Great ideas. So here’s another idea — why don’t we do our own conference with all of this rolled in. If you’re game, get in touch.

    Jan

  30. Robert:

    Great ideas. So here’s another idea — why don’t we do our own conference with all of this rolled in. If you’re game, get in touch.

    Jan

  31. I disagree. I think their conference panel is nicely stacked, particularly for a relatively new event. I think it’s too early to say that Joost isn’t a success, and way too early to say some of these start ups are defining any part of the category. Beyond the handful “web 2.0″ blogs, nobody knows who they are, and I think most people take the perspective from some of these with a very fine grain of salt to begin with. I think having a show with young, new and still unproven start ups (including many on your list) would be a mistake.

    I think NewTeeVee is smart to look to the larger audience, though I agree with Apple being on the list.

  32. I disagree. I think their conference panel is nicely stacked, particularly for a relatively new event. I think it’s too early to say that Joost isn’t a success, and way too early to say some of these start ups are defining any part of the category. Beyond the handful “web 2.0″ blogs, nobody knows who they are, and I think most people take the perspective from some of these with a very fine grain of salt to begin with. I think having a show with young, new and still unproven start ups (including many on your list) would be a mistake.

    I think NewTeeVee is smart to look to the larger audience, though I agree with Apple being on the list.

  33. I agree with most of what you say in this post, but Justin.tv and Kyte having more traffic than Joost in a year’s time? I’m sorry, but that’s completely unrealistic.

    For user generated content, and lets not forget that the great minority of people create content on video networks, people can go to YouTube. There you have a bigger audience. No live-streaming, ok. But that doesn’t matter. Nobody (= not more than 0,5% of the population) wants to see a person’s whole life. People want to see funny or interesting snippets, and they are on YouTube.

    Joost offers premium content. Sure, they haven’t yet proven anything, beside content deals with a lot of major companies, advertising deals with a lot of companies and a beta-tester group of more than a million people.
    What have Justin.tv and Kyte proven? They have no great content (ok, they have Justin and iJustine), no major advertising deals (eg made no ground in monetizing) and have considerably smaller tester teams.

    Yes, there is a risk in Joost. But they have come way further than Kyte and Justin together.

  34. I agree with most of what you say in this post, but Justin.tv and Kyte having more traffic than Joost in a year’s time? I’m sorry, but that’s completely unrealistic.

    For user generated content, and lets not forget that the great minority of people create content on video networks, people can go to YouTube. There you have a bigger audience. No live-streaming, ok. But that doesn’t matter. Nobody (= not more than 0,5% of the population) wants to see a person’s whole life. People want to see funny or interesting snippets, and they are on YouTube.

    Joost offers premium content. Sure, they haven’t yet proven anything, beside content deals with a lot of major companies, advertising deals with a lot of companies and a beta-tester group of more than a million people.
    What have Justin.tv and Kyte proven? They have no great content (ok, they have Justin and iJustine), no major advertising deals (eg made no ground in monetizing) and have considerably smaller tester teams.

    Yes, there is a risk in Joost. But they have come way further than Kyte and Justin together.

  35. Sebastian: the problem is that I know a few things you don’t. I don’t like Justin.tv either. But don’t ignore Kyte and don’t write it off just cause it’s early in the process. I guarantee you that by the end of the year there will be some big names on Kyte (the CEO gave me a preview).

    Joost is one-way media. Two-way media will prove much more viral in the end. But you’re right. That’s a bet I’m making and it might prove out to be wrong. I don’t think so, though.

  36. Sebastian: the problem is that I know a few things you don’t. I don’t like Justin.tv either. But don’t ignore Kyte and don’t write it off just cause it’s early in the process. I guarantee you that by the end of the year there will be some big names on Kyte (the CEO gave me a preview).

    Joost is one-way media. Two-way media will prove much more viral in the end. But you’re right. That’s a bet I’m making and it might prove out to be wrong. I don’t think so, though.

  37. The OnHollyWood conferences get it right they have all their keynotes and sessions broadcast Live and open chat rooms right in the front page for everyone to participate in .They also archive the Keynotes .

    I hope Liz and Om have this planned and if not Why ????

  38. The OnHollyWood conferences get it right they have all their keynotes and sessions broadcast Live and open chat rooms right in the front page for everyone to participate in .They also archive the Keynotes .

    I hope Liz and Om have this planned and if not Why ????

  39. Wow, great list, Robert. Those will be the talking points AT this conference for the next one, for sure.

  40. Multiple tracks solve time constraints. More important, they offer attendees a chance to vote with their feet, something the conference organizers learn from.

  41. Multiple tracks solve time constraints. More important, they offer attendees a chance to vote with their feet, something the conference organizers learn from.

  42. It is not a surprise to see the lineup at the NewTeeVee Live event. I stopped reading them a few weeks ago because I realized that there is much better content about internet TV out there with consistent and accurate coverage. The NTV NY event was a bust and the NTV writer in charge of putting together most of the panels for the Live event is notorious for misquotes and only talking about her friends. Thanks for bringing it all together in one great list! It could have been so much better.

  43. It is not a surprise to see the lineup at the NewTeeVee Live event. I stopped reading them a few weeks ago because I realized that there is much better content about internet TV out there with consistent and accurate coverage. The NTV NY event was a bust and the NTV writer in charge of putting together most of the panels for the Live event is notorious for misquotes and only talking about her friends. Thanks for bringing it all together in one great list! It could have been so much better.

  44. Nothing ‘new’ about “NewTeeVee”, just some of the tools, have become commoditized, and people are simply turning on cameras, thinking it’s automatically a show. But don’t let that fool you, good TV is all (and always has been) about the writing, “new”, old, future or ancient.

    That conference is just a buncha blowhard hot-air, sight, sound and fury, accomplishing nothing.

    And Joost is a simple distributional method, nothing “new” in terms of content or even distribution there.

    New TV to me is the Fall Schedule, Pushing Daisies, Bionic (oddly) I like, but not sure they will survive. Glad to see ole Dexter back, and Califorincation seems all too me-me self-indulgent, but somehow I like it still. Betty back, Rescue Me, Eureka and Kyle get new life, Lost and Jericho coming back. Earl, Office and all the rest chugging along. Dullsville dead-pools: Life Is Wild, Moonlight, Nashville, Private Practice, Dirty Sexy Money, Big Shots, Cane, Carpoolers, Cavemen, Chuck. Journeyman, with ole Lucius Vorenus, a minor-hit. I still miss John from Cincinnati, pout, pout. Henry the VII, seeeeecoooond seasssson yay. Welcome relief after that movie disaster of ‘Elizabeth: The Golden Age.’ Gawd, Hollywood sucks, the real good writing is all TV nowadays; that’s what happens when you make the writer the focus.

  45. Nothing ‘new’ about “NewTeeVee”, just some of the tools, have become commoditized, and people are simply turning on cameras, thinking it’s automatically a show. But don’t let that fool you, good TV is all (and always has been) about the writing, “new”, old, future or ancient.

    That conference is just a buncha blowhard hot-air, sight, sound and fury, accomplishing nothing.

    And Joost is a simple distributional method, nothing “new” in terms of content or even distribution there.

    New TV to me is the Fall Schedule, Pushing Daisies, Bionic (oddly) I like, but not sure they will survive. Glad to see ole Dexter back, and Califorincation seems all too me-me self-indulgent, but somehow I like it still. Betty back, Rescue Me, Eureka and Kyle get new life, Lost and Jericho coming back. Earl, Office and all the rest chugging along. Dullsville dead-pools: Life Is Wild, Moonlight, Nashville, Private Practice, Dirty Sexy Money, Big Shots, Cane, Carpoolers, Cavemen, Chuck. Journeyman, with ole Lucius Vorenus, a minor-hit. I still miss John from Cincinnati, pout, pout. Henry the VII, seeeeecoooond seasssson yay. Welcome relief after that movie disaster of ‘Elizabeth: The Golden Age.’ Gawd, Hollywood sucks, the real good writing is all TV nowadays; that’s what happens when you make the writer the focus.

  46. The thing I find fascinating about Joost, once you get past all the licensing deals, drm, p2p and whatnot, is the community part. Ask them about how they are using television shows and channels to create opportunities for people to chat with each other while watching the same program. In other words, Joost is a context engine for live conversation. As Joost scales up, you’ll find fellow Joosters to share the experience (think movie theaters or watching the ball game with friends at home) whether it’s the first episode of Lassie or the last episode of V The Invasion.

  47. The thing I find fascinating about Joost, once you get past all the licensing deals, drm, p2p and whatnot, is the community part. Ask them about how they are using television shows and channels to create opportunities for people to chat with each other while watching the same program. In other words, Joost is a context engine for live conversation. As Joost scales up, you’ll find fellow Joosters to share the experience (think movie theaters or watching the ball game with friends at home) whether it’s the first episode of Lassie or the last episode of V The Invasion.

  48. Many New Online Video Conferences and Events Lacking Focus, Won’t Survive

    A few days ago, Robert Scoble posted 40 reasons why he thinks NewTeeVee’s conference is lacking substance. He lists a lot of speakers he thinks should be at the event and content that he feels should be included. While I

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