Naked Conversations 2.0: How Google is disrupting the social media starfish

When Shel Israel co-authored Naked Conversations with me we interviewed about 180 companies about how they were using blogs and how that usage was changing their business.

Today I’m watching companies and political candidates and seeing a new trend that I’ve written up as the “Social Media Starfish.” I just did two videos, one that defined the social media starfish and all of its “legs” and another that explains how Google is going to disrupt many pieces of that starfish tomorrow with its Open Social announcement tomorrow.

Some things in text. What are the legs of the social media starfish?

1. Blogs.
2. Photos. Flickr. Smugmug. Zooomr. Photobucket. Facebook. Et al.
3. Videos. YouTube. Kyte. Seesmic. Facebook. Blip. DivX. Etc.
4. Personal social networks. Facebook. BluePulse. MySpace. Hi5. Plaxo. LinkedIn. Bebo. Etc.
5. Events (face to face kind). Upcoming. Eventful. Zvents. Facebook. Meetup. Etc.
6. Email. Integration through Bacn.
7. White label social networks. Ning. Broadband Mechanics. Etc.
8. Wikis. Twiki. Wetpaint. PBWiki. Atlassian. SocialText. Etc.
9. Audio. Podcasting networks. BlogTalkRadio. Utterz. Twittergram. Etc.
10. Microblogs. Twitter. Pownce. Jaiku. Utterz. Tumblr. FriendFeed. Etc.
11. SMS. Services that let organizations build SMS into their social media starfishes. John Edwards is one example.
12. Collaborative tools. Zoho. Zimbra. Google’s docs and spreadsheets. Etc.

It’ll be interesting to see how deeply Google will disrupt the Social Media Starfish tomorrow.

What do you think?

Here’s the two videos:

Part I of Naked Conversations 2.0: defining the social media starfish. 22 minutes.
Part II of Naked Conversations 2.0: how Google will disrupt the social media starfish tomorrow. 18 minutes.

[kyte.tv appKey=MarbachViewerEmbedded&uri=channels/6118/67564&embedId=10008713]

Comments

  1. Great video that I will be pinging over to a few customers. Still getting customers not wanting to look at even blog integration, let alone social networks.

    One thought – all this starfish and no mention of Second Life?

  2. Great video that I will be pinging over to a few customers. Still getting customers not wanting to look at even blog integration, let alone social networks.

    One thought – all this starfish and no mention of Second Life?

  3. …so where does this leave:

    – all the social bookmarking(-sites),
    – commenting (co-comment anyone ?)
    – social TV (Joost, babelgum etc)
    – location/map based social tools (dodgeball, navizon buddyfinder etc)
    – crowdsourcing (amazon mechanical turk etc)

  4. …so where does this leave:

    – all the social bookmarking(-sites),
    – commenting (co-comment anyone ?)
    – social TV (Joost, babelgum etc)
    – location/map based social tools (dodgeball, navizon buddyfinder etc)
    – crowdsourcing (amazon mechanical turk etc)

  5. .. and
    – reviews and recommendations (yelp, angie’s list)
    – gaming (xbox live, playstation network, ea online)
    – im (aim, instant messenger,…)
    – web based events (webEx, genesys)

  6. .. and
    – reviews and recommendations (yelp, angie’s list)
    – gaming (xbox live, playstation network, ea online)
    – im (aim, instant messenger,…)
    – web based events (webEx, genesys)

  7. [...] Robert Scoble talks about the Social Media Starfish as a Conversion Engine: What are the legs of the social media starfish? 1. Blogs. 2. Photos. Flickr. Smugmug. Zooomr. Photobucket. Facebook. Et al. 3. Videos. YouTube. Kyte. Seesmic. Facebook. Blip. DivX. Etc. 4. Personal social networks. Facebook. BluePulse. MySpace. Hi5. Plaxo. LinkedIn. Bebo. Etc. 5. Events (face to face kind). Upcoming. Eventful. Zvents. Facebook. Meetup. Etc. 6. Email. Integration through Bacn. 7. White label social networks. Ning. Broadband Mechanics. Etc. 8. Wikis. Twiki. Wetpaint. PBWiki. Atlassian. SocialText. Etc. 9. Audio. Podcasting networks. BlogTalkRadio. Utterz. Twittergram. Etc. 10. Microblogs. Twitter. Pownce. Jaiku. Utterz. Tumblr. FriendFeed. Etc. 11. SMS. Services that let organizations build SMS into their social media starfishes. John Edwards is one example. 12. Collaborative tools. Zoho. Zimbra. Google’s docs and spreadsheets. Etc. [...]

  8. Robert

    When you sign you name to something such as the “Open Social Web” Bill of rights, you should also defend the concept, trademark and all from being taken over by a single corporate entity.

    Having the ability to own your data and move it from one site to another isn’t the same concept as Google’s platform which is all about Google having access to that data because all the services will be using the same API.

  9. Robert

    When you sign you name to something such as the “Open Social Web” Bill of rights, you should also defend the concept, trademark and all from being taken over by a single corporate entity.

    Having the ability to own your data and move it from one site to another isn’t the same concept as Google’s platform which is all about Google having access to that data because all the services will be using the same API.

  10. To be a platform, any entity needs two things Metcalfe’s Law (each network addition affecting the outcome as some non linear function of total) and an API. OpenSocial has the API but it is not clear how a member addition on one site non linearly affects the whole. See my website for posts relating to the Metcalfe’s Law and Social Networking.

  11. To be a platform, any entity needs two things Metcalfe’s Law (each network addition affecting the outcome as some non linear function of total) and an API. OpenSocial has the API but it is not clear how a member addition on one site non linearly affects the whole. See my website for posts relating to the Metcalfe’s Law and Social Networking.

  12. Scoble’s Starfish

    Last year, while attempting to get a handle on the increasing number of social media, uh, mediums, I created this diagram. I’ve used it fairly often in talks to try to explain the different ways people are interacting on the web.
    Robert Scoble re…

  13. Good afternoon,

    I wasn't sure where exactly to leave my comment but hope it'll find it's way to the proper reader. I just finished reader Naked Conversations (probably later than most) and am excited about blogs and how they can help both my career and my business. I'm a newbie to say the least (my blog has been up for only a few months) but truly believe in the communications revolution coming about. What I wanted to bring up is the 'cultural' reasons some countries may be blogging more than others. On p.124 you speak about “Siestas in the Blogosphere' and it got my attention as my business is in Mexico (I have a SPanish and English blog. Not necessarily mirrored of course) and I see alot of potential here given that blogs have not really been embraced yet. When I brought up the cultural aspect with friends and colleagues here (all latin) several mentioned the 'fear factor'. The thought of publicly publishing your success, lifestyle ,and knowledge scared most of them in a very real way. In Mexico, as in other Latin countries, kidnapping rates are incredibly high and expressing your views is often considered life threatening. I didn't see this mentioned in your book but thought it might be an important point to consider when writing about blogs (or social media in general) and culture. Has anyone mentioned this before?

  14. Good afternoon,

    I wasn't sure where exactly to leave my comment but hope it'll find it's way to the proper reader. I just finished reader Naked Conversations (probably later than most) and am excited about blogs and how they can help both my career and my business. I'm a newbie to say the least (my blog has been up for only a few months) but truly believe in the communications revolution coming about. What I wanted to bring up is the 'cultural' reasons some countries may be blogging more than others. On p.124 you speak about “Siestas in the Blogosphere' and it got my attention as my business is in Mexico (I have a SPanish and English blog. Not necessarily mirrored of course) and I see alot of potential here given that blogs have not really been embraced yet. When I brought up the cultural aspect with friends and colleagues here (all latin) several mentioned the 'fear factor'. The thought of publicly publishing your success, lifestyle ,and knowledge scared most of them in a very real way. In Mexico, as in other Latin countries, kidnapping rates are incredibly high and expressing your views is often considered life threatening. I didn't see this mentioned in your book but thought it might be an important point to consider when writing about blogs (or social media in general) and culture. Has anyone mentioned this before?