Can the "user's" Web come back?

Dave Winer said something deep this morning:

“Are you interested in understanding Disqus? You’ll get one brief piece in TechCrunch on their launch day, but if you find a blogger who uses it, you can really understand how it works, because they will know, and because the publishing tools are now distributed and free, you’ll find out what they think. That’s what’s changed.”

I’ve been looking at my blogging lately and there’s a lot of hidden stuff in Dave’s post today.

It’s why I do my link blog and focus on blogs who actually USE or show me HOW TO USE stuff. Yeah, I put news up there too but lately that’s started falling short for me. I put it there mostly to be complete and make sure I have a database of the best news articles out there too. But the stuff I really like? Is when there’s no intermediary between the product designer/developer/manufacturer and you.

It’s why I like video so much. Especially the long-form unedited type I usually do. Why? Other than my stupid laugh there’s nothing between my subject and you. This is why I hate even being on camera. I’d rather start a conversation and let them demonstrate their stuff straight to you. If I could find a way to make it even more two-way where YOU could have a conversation with them that’d make it very interesting. I’m looking deeply at streaming video to do just that.

It’s also why I like reading blogs — about 800 every evening — and why I like doing my link blog. Through it I can share some surprises that I found. No algorithm like the ones that run TechMeme can find the good little stuff. The user’s point of view.

Regarding Amazon’s Book Reader? I put tons of hands-on reports from the press conference today onto my link blog. I thought about writing a post but I decided against it until I have one in my hands. If that means I don’t get on TechMeme, that’s just fine. It’s time we got back to a user’s Web.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. I agree that Dave’s post this morning was insightful and powerful.

    Your comment on your videos triggered a couple of thoughts: If you really want to make videos that parallel what Dave is talking about, don’t head over to the developer and the CEO… find a smart, passionate user, er, customer to show you the product. When you do the CEO interview, aren’t you being played by a low-stakes version of the same PR game that gets Kindle on the cover of Newsweek?

    As for your laugh… it might be instructive to you to watch one of your vids and log when you laugh and what you laugh at.

  2. I agree that Dave’s post this morning was insightful and powerful.

    Your comment on your videos triggered a couple of thoughts: If you really want to make videos that parallel what Dave is talking about, don’t head over to the developer and the CEO… find a smart, passionate user, er, customer to show you the product. When you do the CEO interview, aren’t you being played by a low-stakes version of the same PR game that gets Kindle on the cover of Newsweek?

    As for your laugh… it might be instructive to you to watch one of your vids and log when you laugh and what you laugh at.

  3. I always believed that the internet is a great equlizer, itcan give voice to anybody. As soon as the rush to make millions is over, we should see new ways of finding content that is meaningful to each individual. Blogging, online news, Video, social networking are all diffrent ways to do the same thing, say something you want heard.
    It’s getting to the point where I can find subjects that intrest me without the baggage of trolls, sales, and PR stuffing their content into what I am reading.

    Guy

  4. I always believed that the internet is a great equlizer, itcan give voice to anybody. As soon as the rush to make millions is over, we should see new ways of finding content that is meaningful to each individual. Blogging, online news, Video, social networking are all diffrent ways to do the same thing, say something you want heard.
    It’s getting to the point where I can find subjects that intrest me without the baggage of trolls, sales, and PR stuffing their content into what I am reading.

    Guy

  5. I don’t often agree with Dave Winer, but the way he speaks about Techmeme resonates with me. Techmeme is an abomination.

    It should be used as a smell test : read Techmeme ? you’re not an informed person.

  6. I don’t often agree with Dave Winer, but the way he speaks about Techmeme resonates with me. Techmeme is an abomination.

    It should be used as a smell test : read Techmeme ? you’re not an informed person.

  7. Robert,

    My hope is that we can intgregate live video into BlogTalkradio’s audio platform which allows six people to talk with each other(from remote locations) while their audience listens or even chimes in.

    It’s a tough nut to crack and that’s why no one has done it.

    We’ll let you know

  8. Robert,

    My hope is that we can intgregate live video into BlogTalkradio’s audio platform which allows six people to talk with each other(from remote locations) while their audience listens or even chimes in.

    It’s a tough nut to crack and that’s why no one has done it.

    We’ll let you know

  9. Scoble! The user’s web is alive and well. We’re in a little cul de sac, off on the side, talking about something that is of little concern to 99.999999999 percent of the people in the US (never mind the world).

  10. Scoble! The user’s web is alive and well. We’re in a little cul de sac, off on the side, talking about something that is of little concern to 99.999999999 percent of the people in the US (never mind the world).