Mashable interviews me on stage at Community Next conference

Mashable’s Pete Cashmore asked his readers for their rudest questions. It made for an interesting discussion about blogging and all sorts of stuff.

Thanks to Noah Kagan for inviting us to do this.

Published by

Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, Scoble travels the world looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology for Rackspace's startup program. He's interviewed thousands of executives and technology innovators and reports what he learns in books ("The Age of Context," a book coauthored with Forbes author Shel Israel, has been released at http://amzn.to/AgeOfContext ), YouTube, and many social media sites where he's followed by millions of people. Best place to watch me is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RobertScoble

Comments

  1. Search Engines WEB did not ask a rude question:

    When did you discover that your blog had reached the Technorati Top 100…… how did that affect your blog and your life?

    Unfortunately, the audio on the interview as horrible.

    That echo combined with Pete’s accent, made it even the more difficult to understand some of what he said.

    Also, he kept looking away back to a table to study the questions – not the best example of etiquette.

    There was not eye contact at all among any of you.

    Why don’t you share your traffic stats for this blog?
    How many unique visitors do you get daily?
    Where do they come from?
    How much from Search Engines and Social Bookmarking sites?

  2. Search Engines WEB did not ask a rude question:

    When did you discover that your blog had reached the Technorati Top 100…… how did that affect your blog and your life?

    Unfortunately, the audio on the interview as horrible.

    That echo combined with Pete’s accent, made it even the more difficult to understand some of what he said.

    Also, he kept looking away back to a table to study the questions – not the best example of etiquette.

    There was not eye contact at all among any of you.

    Why don’t you share your traffic stats for this blog?
    How many unique visitors do you get daily?
    Where do they come from?
    How much from Search Engines and Social Bookmarking sites?

  3. I enjoyed watching the interview broadcast live. Contrary to the comment by @SearchEngines, the interview had more of a “conversation between friends” feel to me, which I enjoyed.

    Not to mention, this was a LIVE interview. Like any interview, the interviewer has notes he works off as the interview progresses. With questions coming from digital sources, Pete’s notes were on his laptop.

    To keep the flow, of course Pete needed to look at his notes while answers were being given. For @SearchEngines to suggest that this was in any way rude, is ridiculous.

    If this was going to be a taped and edited interview, then you would expect to see the seated, well lit interview, with the customary occasional “interviewer nodding in understanding” shot blended in while answers are being given.

    I enjoyed watching the feed live, and especially liked the response when @Scobleizer asked the audience how many were NOT on Twitter… something like only 4% raised their hands!

    I look forward to watching the next one.

  4. I enjoyed watching the interview broadcast live. Contrary to the comment by @SearchEngines, the interview had more of a “conversation between friends” feel to me, which I enjoyed.

    Not to mention, this was a LIVE interview. Like any interview, the interviewer has notes he works off as the interview progresses. With questions coming from digital sources, Pete’s notes were on his laptop.

    To keep the flow, of course Pete needed to look at his notes while answers were being given. For @SearchEngines to suggest that this was in any way rude, is ridiculous.

    If this was going to be a taped and edited interview, then you would expect to see the seated, well lit interview, with the customary occasional “interviewer nodding in understanding” shot blended in while answers are being given.

    I enjoyed watching the feed live, and especially liked the response when @Scobleizer asked the audience how many were NOT on Twitter… something like only 4% raised their hands!

    I look forward to watching the next one.

  5. Rudest? That was a lovefest…

    Ruder would be the Valleywag commenters club, rudest would be YouTube/Figg commenters. Unless you define “rude” as “stuff I don’t agree with” or “smart questions that make me look stupid”. But in terms of raw pure rude, YouTube or Diggers sure take the cake. Wisdom of the masses, ahoy.

    Nearly an hour long, shaky cam video and badly-muffled audio with impossible-to-understand Redcostish accents (no extra chage). No one but the 250 would even bother a millisecond.

  6. Rudest? That was a lovefest…

    Ruder would be the Valleywag commenters club, rudest would be YouTube/Figg commenters. Unless you define “rude” as “stuff I don’t agree with” or “smart questions that make me look stupid”. But in terms of raw pure rude, YouTube or Diggers sure take the cake. Wisdom of the masses, ahoy.

    Nearly an hour long, shaky cam video and badly-muffled audio with impossible-to-understand Redcostish accents (no extra chage). No one but the 250 would even bother a millisecond.

  7. When talking in front of an audience it’s good to look at the audience when you’re speaking.

    The whole shtick of the interview was that Pete was asking questions that were submitted from Mashable, so I didn’t mind him looking at his screen.

    >Why don’t you share your traffic stats for this blog?

    If you ask, I’ll email them to you. WordPress.com doesn’t have a facility to share them with you.

    >How many unique visitors do you get daily?

    I’ll give you my monthly’s:

    February: 428,249
    January: 483,612
    December: 357,357

    >Where do they come from?

    WordPress.com doesn’t share a lot of that data, so I don’t really have a great idea and I don’t really care that much. I know that a link on Digg is worth about 30,000 visitors. One on Reddit is about the same (but the audience is much more intelligent). One on Slashdot, about the same. BBC front page? 10,000. Dave Winer? A few thousand. Valleywag? A thousand. TechMeme? 1,500. But then the Google effect kicks in. I have one of the top links for “Recession” on Google, for instance. That’s been bringing me hundreds of people every day for months.

    >How much from Search Engines and Social Bookmarking sites?

    A lot, but I don’t know the percentages. Fred Wilson just shared his stats and they resonate with my experience too: http://avc.blogs.com/a_vc/2008/03/where-my-traffi.html

  8. When talking in front of an audience it’s good to look at the audience when you’re speaking.

    The whole shtick of the interview was that Pete was asking questions that were submitted from Mashable, so I didn’t mind him looking at his screen.

    >Why don’t you share your traffic stats for this blog?

    If you ask, I’ll email them to you. WordPress.com doesn’t have a facility to share them with you.

    >How many unique visitors do you get daily?

    I’ll give you my monthly’s:

    February: 428,249
    January: 483,612
    December: 357,357

    >Where do they come from?

    WordPress.com doesn’t share a lot of that data, so I don’t really have a great idea and I don’t really care that much. I know that a link on Digg is worth about 30,000 visitors. One on Reddit is about the same (but the audience is much more intelligent). One on Slashdot, about the same. BBC front page? 10,000. Dave Winer? A few thousand. Valleywag? A thousand. TechMeme? 1,500. But then the Google effect kicks in. I have one of the top links for “Recession” on Google, for instance. That’s been bringing me hundreds of people every day for months.

    >How much from Search Engines and Social Bookmarking sites?

    A lot, but I don’t know the percentages. Fred Wilson just shared his stats and they resonate with my experience too: http://avc.blogs.com/a_vc/2008/03/where-my-traffi.html

  9. There’s still a ton of folks out there who haven’t even grasped the concept of how a blog can have a positive influence on their business success – huge kudos to you, Seth and all of the others who GET IT. I can’t wait to see your posts and appreciate being able to stay current as this world evolves.

    We’ve been doing our bit to help real estate investors to harness the ‘new marketing’ and it would be tough without your efforts at the cutting edge.

    Yours with boundless enthusiasm,

    Richard :)

    Chief Deal Weaver
    http://www.BlackWidowNetwork.com

  10. There’s still a ton of folks out there who haven’t even grasped the concept of how a blog can have a positive influence on their business success – huge kudos to you, Seth and all of the others who GET IT. I can’t wait to see your posts and appreciate being able to stay current as this world evolves.

    We’ve been doing our bit to help real estate investors to harness the ‘new marketing’ and it would be tough without your efforts at the cutting edge.

    Yours with boundless enthusiasm,

    Richard :)

    Chief Deal Weaver
    http://www.BlackWidowNetwork.com

  11. you should consider losing some weight you were wearing formals(tailored trousers) in that interview becuase jeans does not fit you proper.

    video sucked by the way clarity was bad for eyes

  12. you should consider losing some weight you were wearing formals(tailored trousers) in that interview becuase jeans does not fit you proper.

    video sucked by the way clarity was bad for eyes

  13. Great interview Robert. You are as articulate and composed as you are knowledgeable. Cashmore seemed, in my opinion, to be a bit too promotional on his part.

  14. Great interview Robert. You are as articulate and composed as you are knowledgeable. Cashmore seemed, in my opinion, to be a bit too promotional on his part.

  15. I was interested also about your comment in the interview that if one wants to be central to the conversation one must be there in the first 15 minutes, to attain central links etc. (and then the Google audience etc. comes in after that) and the effect that formal editing processes plays within that (basis of the interview question). So much that could be explored there.

  16. I was interested also about your comment in the interview that if one wants to be central to the conversation one must be there in the first 15 minutes, to attain central links etc. (and then the Google audience etc. comes in after that) and the effect that formal editing processes plays within that (basis of the interview question). So much that could be explored there.

  17. Hi Robert,

    Thanks for the interview/video, finally got through it all.

    Insightful, but my eyes still hurt -is there any way that a higher res. video can be stored on the device, so that there isn’t just one lowest-common denominator version.

    Some of these video’s are worthy of historical archive, but in the future they’ll be like black & white pictures are to many now.

    I know that forscene.net, that programe from Forbidden Technologies does something like that, but they’re not based in the U.S.

    Yours kindly,

    Shakir Razak

  18. Hi Robert,

    Thanks for the interview/video, finally got through it all.

    Insightful, but my eyes still hurt -is there any way that a higher res. video can be stored on the device, so that there isn’t just one lowest-common denominator version.

    Some of these video’s are worthy of historical archive, but in the future they’ll be like black & white pictures are to many now.

    I know that forscene.net, that programe from Forbidden Technologies does something like that, but they’re not based in the U.S.

    Yours kindly,

    Shakir Razak