Putting multiple fingers on Microsoft's Windows 7

OK, so tonight Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer showed off a tiny piece of Windows 7: that multi-touch capabilities will be built into the OS. Tons of info on this over on TechMeme.

Of course, viewers here last week had a lengthy discussion and demo with the guy who invented these features inside Microsoft Research.

Why aren’t they leading with Microsoft’s Live Mesh? Easy, multi-touch is sexy and easy to demo, even if they won’t really increase sales of WIndows that much. Why do I say that? Remember back in 2002/2003? I was really excited by the Tablet PC functionality. That never really increased sales much because it solved a problem people really didn’t have. Same with the multi-touch stuff. How many of you really need these features? They’d be nice to have to show off to your friends, but after that show off factor is gone, do they really improve your life? Microsoft so far hasn’t shown us how these features really go beyond a cool demo.

And, anyway, where do we need these kinds of features? Not really on a laptop where we have a mouse or trackpad, but we need these things on mobile phones where we’ll be using the things while standing up. The iPhone showed us that.

So, now what? Watch three things:

1. Google’s Android. That’s aimed at the new sweet spot in the industry where growth is rapidly going.
2. Microsoft’s Live Mesh. Ray Ozzie’s system is getting attention as a developer platform that’ll keep Windows relevant even as much of the world moves toward an online cloud-based world.
3. Apple’s iPhone and a secret device that’s been spotted in their labs. An Apple employee I know told me about a new looking small PC device inside Apple’s labs.

Anyway, this all doesn’t matter, although all the bloggers in the world love this cause it brings page views and gives us something new to talk about other than whether or not Twitter is up or down. So, forgive me if I’m going back to sleep.

Comments

  1. “Apple’s iPhone and a secret device that’s been spotted in their labs. An Apple employee I know told me about a new looking small PC device inside Apple’s labs.”

    1. Good job getting someone fired considering very few people know about such a device.
    2. I am shocked you would say something so flimsy.
    3. Just because it’s in the labs doesn’t mean it’ll come to market.

  2. “Apple’s iPhone and a secret device that’s been spotted in their labs. An Apple employee I know told me about a new looking small PC device inside Apple’s labs.”

    1. Good job getting someone fired considering very few people know about such a device.
    2. I am shocked you would say something so flimsy.
    3. Just because it’s in the labs doesn’t mean it’ll come to market.

  3. >Just because it’s in the labs doesn’t mean it’ll come to market.

    Are we talking about Windows 7’s Multi Touch features, or the Apple micro-PC some employee told me about?

  4. >Just because it’s in the labs doesn’t mean it’ll come to market.

    Are we talking about Windows 7’s Multi Touch features, or the Apple micro-PC some employee told me about?

  5. Alex: an Apple employee I know said he saw something that looked smaller than a MacBookAir inside their labs. Top secret stuff. Is it true? I have no clue, my ability to get accurate info out of Apple isn’t very good.

  6. Alex: an Apple employee I know said he saw something that looked smaller than a MacBookAir inside their labs. Top secret stuff. Is it true? I have no clue, my ability to get accurate info out of Apple isn’t very good.

  7. since i’m not a tech blogger, I’m confident Windows 7.0 news will not drive any traffic to my blog! I can see several application uses for the multitouch screen, but I agree it won’t do much for sales for a long while and besides Apple will probably launch an iMac with it before Win 7 launches.

    I’m sure it’s way too much to hope that the secret Apple device you cite is an updated AppleTV with true HD and DVR and slingbox functionality built-in allowing me to beam all of my media to any video display I have access to or my iPhone…but I will hope anyway!

  8. since i’m not a tech blogger, I’m confident Windows 7.0 news will not drive any traffic to my blog! I can see several application uses for the multitouch screen, but I agree it won’t do much for sales for a long while and besides Apple will probably launch an iMac with it before Win 7 launches.

    I’m sure it’s way too much to hope that the secret Apple device you cite is an updated AppleTV with true HD and DVR and slingbox functionality built-in allowing me to beam all of my media to any video display I have access to or my iPhone…but I will hope anyway!

  9. I am talking about the micro-PC device in the Apple labs. Sure, it may never come to market but I know there are many people like me that would love to know what this product does.

  10. I am talking about the micro-PC device in the Apple labs. Sure, it may never come to market but I know there are many people like me that would love to know what this product does.

  11. There are three areas where I see multi-touch easily fitting in from what we’ve seen so far from Apple, Microsoft, and various research efforts:

    small displays, like the iPhone, where space is limited for UI hints. Gestures work well here.

    horizontal displays (slate Tablet PC sitting on a table, Surface computer), especially with more than one user trying to interact with it at a time

    large, interactive whiteboards (TouchWall and the like) particularly where more than one person might be using them at a time

    Beyond these general areas a handful of specialized apps come to mind–many of them in the arts, navigating large maps, manually sorting things, and so on.

    This is just one more way to interact with our computers. Sometimes it’ll make sense. Sometimes not. Maybe you’re right and it’ll do little more than help us to remove the single mouse limit. That would be fine by me too.

    Will it help sell more copies of Windows? I don’t know. But I do see a convergence here in the user interaction model that Apple, Microsoft and others are arriving at across multiple device types. That’s something new and may open up new things that haven’t been practical up to this point.

  12. There are three areas where I see multi-touch easily fitting in from what we’ve seen so far from Apple, Microsoft, and various research efforts:

    small displays, like the iPhone, where space is limited for UI hints. Gestures work well here.

    horizontal displays (slate Tablet PC sitting on a table, Surface computer), especially with more than one user trying to interact with it at a time

    large, interactive whiteboards (TouchWall and the like) particularly where more than one person might be using them at a time

    Beyond these general areas a handful of specialized apps come to mind–many of them in the arts, navigating large maps, manually sorting things, and so on.

    This is just one more way to interact with our computers. Sometimes it’ll make sense. Sometimes not. Maybe you’re right and it’ll do little more than help us to remove the single mouse limit. That would be fine by me too.

    Will it help sell more copies of Windows? I don’t know. But I do see a convergence here in the user interaction model that Apple, Microsoft and others are arriving at across multiple device types. That’s something new and may open up new things that haven’t been practical up to this point.

  13. what I would like to know is how Apple decides what goes to market and what doesn’t… I can’t be through market research otherwise there would be more leaks about their products. Is it simply Steve Jobs genius? Or perhaps a group of very clued in people who simply love what they do.

    I guess at the end of the day Apple’s approach is let’s release a product that solves peoples problems (or perhaps their own problems). On the other hand Microsoft’s approach is let’s release a product and let the market figure out what to do with it.

    I guess the first approach in some what protects the consumer from vapor ware and in the long run makes for more happy customers.

  14. what I would like to know is how Apple decides what goes to market and what doesn’t… I can’t be through market research otherwise there would be more leaks about their products. Is it simply Steve Jobs genius? Or perhaps a group of very clued in people who simply love what they do.

    I guess at the end of the day Apple’s approach is let’s release a product that solves peoples problems (or perhaps their own problems). On the other hand Microsoft’s approach is let’s release a product and let the market figure out what to do with it.

    I guess the first approach in some what protects the consumer from vapor ware and in the long run makes for more happy customers.

  15. just been reading a good number of blogs about the Windows Multi-touch demo. I must say I am getting tired of companies trying to sell this oh so cool new feature…

    Let’s face it. Multi-touch really is only a simple driver problem. In theory it’s pretty simply and straight forward to let’s say write a mouse driver that let’s you connect two mice with two mouse pointers that can be controlled individually. Multi-touch really is only an extension of that.

    If this was such a killer feature I guess a third party software developer would have already done this… as a matter of fact why wouldn’t WACOM develop this? Aren’t they the kings of touch?

    Anyone recently used a touch screen ATM? Most of them seem to be running on some version of Windows these days… most of them are single touch enabled but still most of them also provide you hardware buttons. Why? Because most of the time the touch screen reacts so poorly to user input the average user can hardly figure out how to use it.

    I have developed touch screen applications for some of my customer before and from stats we collected we found that the majority of users found it hard enough to push an onscreen soft button. When it came to dragging something across the screen most people simply had problems with that. When we asked users why the usual answer was that while they understood how the interface functioned they simply couldn’t be bother to interact with the system in a way that was more complex than pressing a button.

    I wonder if any of the research labs are taking these sort of experiences into consideration.

  16. just been reading a good number of blogs about the Windows Multi-touch demo. I must say I am getting tired of companies trying to sell this oh so cool new feature…

    Let’s face it. Multi-touch really is only a simple driver problem. In theory it’s pretty simply and straight forward to let’s say write a mouse driver that let’s you connect two mice with two mouse pointers that can be controlled individually. Multi-touch really is only an extension of that.

    If this was such a killer feature I guess a third party software developer would have already done this… as a matter of fact why wouldn’t WACOM develop this? Aren’t they the kings of touch?

    Anyone recently used a touch screen ATM? Most of them seem to be running on some version of Windows these days… most of them are single touch enabled but still most of them also provide you hardware buttons. Why? Because most of the time the touch screen reacts so poorly to user input the average user can hardly figure out how to use it.

    I have developed touch screen applications for some of my customer before and from stats we collected we found that the majority of users found it hard enough to push an onscreen soft button. When it came to dragging something across the screen most people simply had problems with that. When we asked users why the usual answer was that while they understood how the interface functioned they simply couldn’t be bother to interact with the system in a way that was more complex than pressing a button.

    I wonder if any of the research labs are taking these sort of experiences into consideration.

  17. The worst thing according to me – The Ultimate Edition – Can’t we friggin’ have just one edition! High time MS stopped the BS.

  18. The worst thing according to me – The Ultimate Edition – Can’t we friggin’ have just one edition! High time MS stopped the BS.

  19. I first started reading you during the Tablet PC era, and for a long time your feed was filed under “Tablet PC” in my reader :)

    I don’t think you’re quite right that it was trying to solve a problem which didn’t exist, but the form-factor of Tablets wasn’t right, and neither was the pricing. Tablet PC’s needed to be the price and size of the eeePC, not several hundred dollars over the cost of an equivalent notebook.

    I still have my Acer C110, which is the best tablet (in terms of form) that I ever used. Lovely machine. I just wish it ran Mac OS X instead of Windows… :)

  20. I first started reading you during the Tablet PC era, and for a long time your feed was filed under “Tablet PC” in my reader :)

    I don’t think you’re quite right that it was trying to solve a problem which didn’t exist, but the form-factor of Tablets wasn’t right, and neither was the pricing. Tablet PC’s needed to be the price and size of the eeePC, not several hundred dollars over the cost of an equivalent notebook.

    I still have my Acer C110, which is the best tablet (in terms of form) that I ever used. Lovely machine. I just wish it ran Mac OS X instead of Windows… :)

  21. Up against the nintendo, sony, and even apple regimes, there’s still hope for the living room and entertainment, gaming, etc, however, just because there’s a few smart people at microsoft here and there, doesn’t mean they can/will be allowed to do greater things.

  22. Up against the nintendo, sony, and even apple regimes, there’s still hope for the living room and entertainment, gaming, etc, however, just because there’s a few smart people at microsoft here and there, doesn’t mean they can/will be allowed to do greater things.

  23. I re-read my comment and it made no sense.

    Abridged: Microsoft might have some neat stuff, but the deployment and integration with other divisions (like xbox) will suck or Not Happen, and MS will continue to fail against the Sony, Nintendo, and Apples of the world.

    That’s the Microsoft way, I suppose. Oh well.

  24. I re-read my comment and it made no sense.

    Abridged: Microsoft might have some neat stuff, but the deployment and integration with other divisions (like xbox) will suck or Not Happen, and MS will continue to fail against the Sony, Nintendo, and Apples of the world.

    That’s the Microsoft way, I suppose. Oh well.

  25. Agree abut the tocuh screen being eye candy, but you’ve got to remember that Mesh is not just Windows technology. Mesh is the productisation of the FeedSync concepts that Jack Ozzies team from Groove created, post the Groove acquisition.

    I see Mesh the product as an attempt to keep /Microsoft/ relevant in an increasingly heterogenous mix of devices. It competes by allowing you to integrate any device, mobile or not, into a seamless collaboration environment – your PC, Mac, Linux box, or Android phone will all work with Mesh.

    The Mesh SDK isn’t with us yet, but the FeedSync platform is, and using sync, anyone can write adapters for any application or device can read and update an RSS feed.

  26. Agree abut the tocuh screen being eye candy, but you’ve got to remember that Mesh is not just Windows technology. Mesh is the productisation of the FeedSync concepts that Jack Ozzies team from Groove created, post the Groove acquisition.

    I see Mesh the product as an attempt to keep /Microsoft/ relevant in an increasingly heterogenous mix of devices. It competes by allowing you to integrate any device, mobile or not, into a seamless collaboration environment – your PC, Mac, Linux box, or Android phone will all work with Mesh.

    The Mesh SDK isn’t with us yet, but the FeedSync platform is, and using sync, anyone can write adapters for any application or device can read and update an RSS feed.

  27. In related news, “Windows 7″ will run on both PowerPC and x86 architectures, ship with Safari as the default browser and run only on hardware designed in Cupertino…

    Tom: There are plenty of bad implementations of touch-sensitivity out there, no doubt including those ATMs (for that matter, most ATMs I’ve used manage to deliver a lousy UX with buttons, never mind trying anything more complex!), but Apple have already cracked that one. The hard part is scaling the hard glass touchscreen up to 10″ without resulting in either excessive weight or fragility.

  28. In related news, “Windows 7″ will run on both PowerPC and x86 architectures, ship with Safari as the default browser and run only on hardware designed in Cupertino…

    Tom: There are plenty of bad implementations of touch-sensitivity out there, no doubt including those ATMs (for that matter, most ATMs I’ve used manage to deliver a lousy UX with buttons, never mind trying anything more complex!), but Apple have already cracked that one. The hard part is scaling the hard glass touchscreen up to 10″ without resulting in either excessive weight or fragility.

  29. Robert, you said “…but after that show off factor is gone, do they really improve your life?”

    I guess when the mouse was first showed off to Xerox executives they thought the same thing. Man, look at where we are now!

    I thought by now that you’d understand that it is easy to be short-sighted with technology. Technology has a way of morphing into products that the initial inventor never thought about.

    Multi touch has some interesting interfacing opportunities in the future.

  30. Robert, you said “…but after that show off factor is gone, do they really improve your life?”

    I guess when the mouse was first showed off to Xerox executives they thought the same thing. Man, look at where we are now!

    I thought by now that you’d understand that it is easy to be short-sighted with technology. Technology has a way of morphing into products that the initial inventor never thought about.

    Multi touch has some interesting interfacing opportunities in the future.

  31. What is coming out of Apple labs in september is a 9″ MacBook Air called MacBook Nano starting at $999 and in beautiful iPod-like colors. With 1024×768 screen resolution and guess what… MULTI TOUCH!!!

    You don’t have to wait til 2010 to get the technology of the future, today.

    Thanks Apple, from a loyal customer and proud fanboy.

  32. What is coming out of Apple labs in september is a 9″ MacBook Air called MacBook Nano starting at $999 and in beautiful iPod-like colors. With 1024×768 screen resolution and guess what… MULTI TOUCH!!!

    You don’t have to wait til 2010 to get the technology of the future, today.

    Thanks Apple, from a loyal customer and proud fanboy.

  33. it solved a problem people really didn’t have. Same with the multi-touch stuff.

    Well, well, I agree. But I find interacting with the iPhone, beyond a rudimentary basic level, a real pain, just givemee a full-mini-keyboard or Blackberry. The iPhone is a great device, but more flied under the consumerish “toy” category.

    Was kinda hoping for a portable device updated touch OS from Palm like 5 years ago. Even that rather innovative Vista-launch HP touch-screen system, went nowhere, on sale at every retail outfit.

    Maybe with Window 7, we will get Windows Mobile 7, the finally functional version. Speaking of, you can’t buy non-phone Windows Mobile handhelds, like hardly anywhere these days, yet crappy Palms are still all over the place.

  34. it solved a problem people really didn’t have. Same with the multi-touch stuff.

    Well, well, I agree. But I find interacting with the iPhone, beyond a rudimentary basic level, a real pain, just givemee a full-mini-keyboard or Blackberry. The iPhone is a great device, but more flied under the consumerish “toy” category.

    Was kinda hoping for a portable device updated touch OS from Palm like 5 years ago. Even that rather innovative Vista-launch HP touch-screen system, went nowhere, on sale at every retail outfit.

    Maybe with Window 7, we will get Windows Mobile 7, the finally functional version. Speaking of, you can’t buy non-phone Windows Mobile handhelds, like hardly anywhere these days, yet crappy Palms are still all over the place.

  35. @tom: “Let’s face it. Multi-touch really is only a simple driver problem….” Yep, multi-touch and multiple mice are logical next steps. On a mass market level it’ll be more practical to build applications that support multiple users and simultaneous, multiple touch points. Think in terms of driving the costs down on “high end” interactive whiteboards in and out of the classroom. How far this will go, no one knows. Although, I wonder if now we’ll see more “chord” style multi-touch UIs in your favorite fast food restaurants? Why do we have to always press one…..button……at……a…….time?

  36. @tom: “Let’s face it. Multi-touch really is only a simple driver problem….” Yep, multi-touch and multiple mice are logical next steps. On a mass market level it’ll be more practical to build applications that support multiple users and simultaneous, multiple touch points. Think in terms of driving the costs down on “high end” interactive whiteboards in and out of the classroom. How far this will go, no one knows. Although, I wonder if now we’ll see more “chord” style multi-touch UIs in your favorite fast food restaurants? Why do we have to always press one…..button……at……a…….time?

  37. If this was apple releasing this, you would be gaga googoo over multi-touch. I would say touch on PC is just as important (if not more so than a phone).

    People were super excited about multi-touch on Apple’s laptop touch pad and of course the iPhone, so why the “this is so lame” for multi-touch in windows.

    It will be great for laptops, no more having to take an external mouse around all the time. Showing a presentation for work, no need to reach down try to find the space bar or arrow key to switch slides, just flick your finger across the screen quick. etc etc.

    Multi-touch on the desktop will be really huge for companies, medical stuff, we already see it on ATMs, gas pumps, light rail stations, etc.

    I think monitors in general will change to make multi-touch more logical for the average user, instead of the more “static” montior base, they will become more dynmic in that you will be able to tilt your monitor to face upwards and you use it more like a “table” where you are looking down onto it.

    They will be similar to a “Cintiq wacom tablet” where you interact with it as a screen and as a tablet. I know several people with a Cintiq and they totally love it, now this feature will be native to windows. I think that is pretty sweet.

    If you want to be like the people who stayed on a typewriter and not switch to better technology, then by all means Scoble have fun in the past.

  38. If this was apple releasing this, you would be gaga googoo over multi-touch. I would say touch on PC is just as important (if not more so than a phone).

    People were super excited about multi-touch on Apple’s laptop touch pad and of course the iPhone, so why the “this is so lame” for multi-touch in windows.

    It will be great for laptops, no more having to take an external mouse around all the time. Showing a presentation for work, no need to reach down try to find the space bar or arrow key to switch slides, just flick your finger across the screen quick. etc etc.

    Multi-touch on the desktop will be really huge for companies, medical stuff, we already see it on ATMs, gas pumps, light rail stations, etc.

    I think monitors in general will change to make multi-touch more logical for the average user, instead of the more “static” montior base, they will become more dynmic in that you will be able to tilt your monitor to face upwards and you use it more like a “table” where you are looking down onto it.

    They will be similar to a “Cintiq wacom tablet” where you interact with it as a screen and as a tablet. I know several people with a Cintiq and they totally love it, now this feature will be native to windows. I think that is pretty sweet.

    If you want to be like the people who stayed on a typewriter and not switch to better technology, then by all means Scoble have fun in the past.

  39. Yes, the different Microsoft editions are completely aggrivating. Apple has is down with it’s OS, MS should take note.

  40. Yes, the different Microsoft editions are completely aggrivating. Apple has is down with it’s OS, MS should take note.

  41. Could not agree more with you. The mutli-touch features of the new windows isn’t a big deal to me. While Im browsing the web, I have one hand on the mouse and the other one I like to grab and scratch my balls .

  42. Could not agree more with you. The mutli-touch features of the new windows isn’t a big deal to me. While Im browsing the web, I have one hand on the mouse and the other one I like to grab and scratch my balls .

  43. Micah says

    If this was apple releasing this, you would be gaga googoo over multi-touch. I would say touch on PC is just as important (if not more so than a phone).

    I agree If this was Apple or Google Robert would be tripping all over him self about how great this is.

    Apple will intro it’s next point release OSX kitty and claim to have invented the toaster and Microwave oven.

    All the Apple fan boys will tap into their selective memories and claim this to be true.

  44. Micah says

    If this was apple releasing this, you would be gaga googoo over multi-touch. I would say touch on PC is just as important (if not more so than a phone).

    I agree If this was Apple or Google Robert would be tripping all over him self about how great this is.

    Apple will intro it’s next point release OSX kitty and claim to have invented the toaster and Microwave oven.

    All the Apple fan boys will tap into their selective memories and claim this to be true.

  45. My gut reaction is that this be a fancy gee-whiz demo, with zero real-world usage. But with Scoble down on it, Microsoft might pull a miracle and actually make it into something functional. Now, if the coin turns, and Scoble gets all hot over it, you know it’s doomed. The key for Microsoft, is to keep Scoble disinterested, being seriously hostile.

  46. My gut reaction is that this be a fancy gee-whiz demo, with zero real-world usage. But with Scoble down on it, Microsoft might pull a miracle and actually make it into something functional. Now, if the coin turns, and Scoble gets all hot over it, you know it’s doomed. The key for Microsoft, is to keep Scoble disinterested, being seriously hostile.

  47. In response to Loren Heiny’s “it’ll do little more than help us to remove the single mouse limit” statement, I would like to say that adding touch-screen capability will do little to solve anybody’s problems, because:

    1. Everybody’s so used to using a mouse or touchpad, will anybody use the feature anyway?
    2. Nobody wants to buy a new monitor to use a feature that boring.
    3. If the feature is usable for anything other than Windows itself, how many companies are going to go to the effort of integrating it into their software?

    But back to your remove the single-mouse limit statement, I think many people would like to have the ability to have more than one mouse connected at a time. I know it would make it much easier when helping show my parents how to do something, or when browsing the web with a friend, or any multi-person activity. We’ve all sat down with someone and either passed the mouse back and forth, or pointed and said “click on this, click on that”, haven’t we? Now that would solve a problem. And I think that now that most towers have USB ports in the front as well, people would like this since it is so much easier to connect/disconnect devices such as a mouse.

  48. In response to Loren Heiny’s “it’ll do little more than help us to remove the single mouse limit” statement, I would like to say that adding touch-screen capability will do little to solve anybody’s problems, because:

    1. Everybody’s so used to using a mouse or touchpad, will anybody use the feature anyway?
    2. Nobody wants to buy a new monitor to use a feature that boring.
    3. If the feature is usable for anything other than Windows itself, how many companies are going to go to the effort of integrating it into their software?

    But back to your remove the single-mouse limit statement, I think many people would like to have the ability to have more than one mouse connected at a time. I know it would make it much easier when helping show my parents how to do something, or when browsing the web with a friend, or any multi-person activity. We’ve all sat down with someone and either passed the mouse back and forth, or pointed and said “click on this, click on that”, haven’t we? Now that would solve a problem. And I think that now that most towers have USB ports in the front as well, people would like this since it is so much easier to connect/disconnect devices such as a mouse.

  49. In addition to my previous comment, I have a feeling that a number of people won’t like the touch-screen because of the physical size. Some people’s fingers are larger than other’s, which might sometimes make it a little bit hard to “click” or “select” certain things, especially when there are a lot of things crowded together (try highlighting text or selecting an area of a graphic!). I’m sure that even Microsoft will provide an alternative way to do these things, but I just wanted to mention another reason people won’t like the touch-screen.

  50. In addition to my previous comment, I have a feeling that a number of people won’t like the touch-screen because of the physical size. Some people’s fingers are larger than other’s, which might sometimes make it a little bit hard to “click” or “select” certain things, especially when there are a lot of things crowded together (try highlighting text or selecting an area of a graphic!). I’m sure that even Microsoft will provide an alternative way to do these things, but I just wanted to mention another reason people won’t like the touch-screen.

  51. Touch smutch! We should have had this technology in PCs years ago! Give me a break! My new cell phone has this and does it well might I add! What I am wondering is where is MS Speech server in the latest OS releases? Gates showed that to us almost 2 years ago now and still no word of it being integrated into a core OS release. Touch might help my productivity a bit… but speech… now I can get stuff done quickly when my computer can listen to me talk!

  52. Touch smutch! We should have had this technology in PCs years ago! Give me a break! My new cell phone has this and does it well might I add! What I am wondering is where is MS Speech server in the latest OS releases? Gates showed that to us almost 2 years ago now and still no word of it being integrated into a core OS release. Touch might help my productivity a bit… but speech… now I can get stuff done quickly when my computer can listen to me talk!

  53. after vista I just hate miscrosoft……….now I hv started using linux…

    it’s free……..

  54. after vista I just hate miscrosoft……….now I hv started using linux…

    it’s free……..